In the News Archive

2017

Two NIEHS grantees have received the prestigious Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). Catherine Karr was among 102 recipients honored in 2017.

NIEHS Environmental Factor | February 21, 2017
Two NIEHS grantees win prestigious White House awards

In any shared shower facility, you're going to find the the obvious post-workout body detritus—sweat, skin cells, clumps of hair. A recent survey found 62 percent of people pee in the shower on a regular basis. Some environmental activists encourage this as a way to conserve water and cut down on toilet paper use. But just how gross is it to forego footwear in the locker room? Vice asked Marilyn Roberts.

Vice | February 17, 2017
How gross is going barefoot in a locker room shower?

Through a partnership with the California Environmental Health Tracking Program, University of Washington, and with funding from the National Institutes of Health, California's Imperial Valley Air Quality Control project installed 40 air quality monitors throughout the valley and set up a website to gather pollution information and community-generated reports. Edmund Seto is quoted.

TruthOut | February 17, 2017
In California's Imperial Valley, residents aren't waiting for government to track pollution

The future is expected to hold more deadly heat waves, the fast spread of certain infectious diseases and catastrophic food shortages. These events could cause premature deaths -- and they're all related to climate change, according to a panel of experts who gathered at the Carter Center in Atlanta on Feb. 16 for the Climate & Health Meeting. Howard Frumkin is quoted.

CNN | February 16, 2017
Scientists highlight deadly health risks of climate change

Some of the health risks of inhaling fine and ultrafine particles are well-established, such as asthma, lung cancer, and, most recently, heart disease. But a growing body of evidence suggests that exposure can also harm the brain, accelerating cognitive aging, and may even increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Lianne Sheppard is quoted.

Science | January 26, 2017
The polluted brain: Evidence builds that dirty air causes Alzheimer's, dementia

Catherine Karr, professor of pediatrics in the UW School of Medicine and of environmental and occupational health sciences in the UW School of Public Health, was among the 102 recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, announced by the White House during President Obama's final days in office.

UW Today | January 26, 2017
Two UW professors win Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

Sophie the Giraffe, a teething toy designed for children 18 months and under, is the latest item geared toward babies that is under fire by parents who discovered mold inside the toy’s cavity. Experts talk to Healthline about these reports and what parents can do to keep their kids healthy. Sheela Sathyanarayana is quoted.

Healthline | January 25, 2017
Sophie the Giraffe has mold? Should parents worry?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it recently postponed a gathering it had planned to hold next month on the effects of climate change on health. The Climate Change and Health Summit was organized to bring scientists and public-health practitioners together to discuss implementing climate-related health initiatives. Howard Frumkin, former director of the CDC Center for Environmental Health, was quoted.

The Wall Street Journal | January 24, 2017
CDC halts meeting on climate change and health

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has canceled a conference next month on climate change and health. The Climate Change and Health Summit was organized to bring scientists and public-health practitioners together to discuss implementing climate-related health initiatives. Kristie Ebi, a professor in Global Health and in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, is quoted.

PBS News Hour | January 23, 2017
CDC cancels climate conference, but doesn’t say why

Despite significant improvements in the last 25 years, U.S. construction workers are still at high risk for on-the-job injuries to muscles, tendons, joints and nerves, a new study reports. June Spector, who was not involved with the study, was quoted.

Reuters | January 16, 2017
Construction workers still at high risk for strains and sprains