In the News Archive

2017

Sophie the Giraffe, a teething toy designed for children 18 months and under, is the latest item geared toward babies that is under fire by parents who discovered mold inside the toy’s cavity. Experts talk to Healthline about these reports and what parents can do to keep their kids healthy. Sheela Sathyanarayana is quoted.

Healthline | January 25, 2017
Sophie the Giraffe has mold? Should parents worry?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it recently postponed a gathering it had planned to hold next month on the effects of climate change on health. The Climate Change and Health Summit was organized to bring scientists and public-health practitioners together to discuss implementing climate-related health initiatives. Howard Frumkin, former director of the CDC Center for Environmental Health, was quoted.

The Wall Street Journal | January 24, 2017
CDC halts meeting on climate change and health

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has canceled a conference next month on climate change and health. The Climate Change and Health Summit was organized to bring scientists and public-health practitioners together to discuss implementing climate-related health initiatives. Kristie Ebi, a professor in Global Health and in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, is quoted.

PBS News Hour | January 23, 2017
CDC cancels climate conference, but doesn’t say why

Despite significant improvements in the last 25 years, U.S. construction workers are still at high risk for on-the-job injuries to muscles, tendons, joints and nerves, a new study reports. June Spector, who was not involved with the study, was quoted.

Reuters | January 16, 2017
Construction workers still at high risk for strains and sprains

The NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) FEST was held from Dec. 5-8 in Durham, North Carolina. In the opening plenary session, SPH's Joel Kaufman shared epidemiological evidence linking air pollution with cardiovascular disease, especially heart attacks and strokes.

NIEHS Environmental Factor | January 11, 2017
EHS FEST: air pollution research informs regulations, improves health

2016

Veterinarians play a key role in combating the global risk of antimicrobial resistance, say researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health. However, a new study shows that, while veterinarians are concerned about the threat of drug-resistant bugs, they face financial barriers to obtaining tests to guide therapy.

December 29, 2016
Improving Veterinary Antimicrobial Practices Will Help Combat Growing Global Health Issue

Veterinarians play a key role in combatting the global risk of antimicrobial resistance, say researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health. However, a new study shows that, while veterinarians are concerned about the threat of drug-resistant bugs, they face financial barriers to obtaining tests to guide therapy.

SPH news | December 29, 2016
Combating the global risk of antimicrobial resistance

Pacific island countries are among the most vulnerable in the world to the current and future health risks of climate change, according to a group of international researchers that includes Kristie Ebi from the UW School of Public Health.

In House | December 19, 2016
Impacts of climate change in the Pacific

Assembled to review evidence of whether glyphosate is a human carcinogen, the members of a Scientific Advisory Panel of the Environmental Protection Agency offered opinions on EPA's conclusion that the active ingredient in Roundup, the world's most widely used herbicide, is “not likely to be carcinogenic to humans.” Lianne Shepard is quoted.

AgriPulse | December 16, 2016
Glyphosate panel split on chemical's carcinogenicity

Critics say the answer pharmaceutical companies are pushing to address the ongoing opioid crisis boosts their profits while forcing taxpayers to shoulder the costs. Gary Franklin is quoted.

Associated Press | December 15, 2016
Drugmakers set to gain as taxpayers foot new opioid costs