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For women electricians, laborers, carpenters and other tradeswomen, the #MeToo movement is creating new opportunities to speak up about harassment and bias they face that can lead to on-the-job injuries and illnesses.
Lockridge will be among the featured speakers at the Worker Memorial Day event April 25 on the University of Washington campus, with the theme of “Raising the Bar: Worker Rights, Safety and #MeToo Awareness.”
Chehalis flooding on I5; wsdot flickr
Four innovative research projects involving faculty from the UW Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS) will receive grants from the University of Washington Population Health Initiative to pursue interdisciplinary approaches to improve health and reduce health disparities in vulnerable communities.
(Seattle) February 8, 2018 - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded the University of Washington a $2,996,426 grant to help fund the "Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution - Next Stage (MESA Air Next)" project, building on more than a decade of research that looks at the connection between inhaled small particle pollution and increased risks of stroke, heart attacks and other cardiovascular disease.
Over the past 14 years, EPA has invested $33 million and leveraged over another $70 million from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

The UW School of Public Health remains committed to building a more diverse and welcoming institution. To that end, six master’s fellowships were awarded this academic year by the School to promising scholars from diverse backgrounds. Each of these outstanding students receives $20,000 over two years.
Mike Krause (MSPH '83), a senior industrial hygienist for Veritox, has worked to identify health hazards in workplaces for more than 30 years. We caught up with Krause to learn how his studies in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences prepared him to protect the health and safety of people at work and in their communities.
Death, dismemberment, damage, disruption and distress. These are dangers people face during and immediately after storms like Harvey and Irma. But what about the hidden hazards of hurricanes? Experts from the University of Washington School of Public Health weigh in.
Joel Kaufman and Howard Frumkin from the University of Washington School of Public Health have been elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences for their outstanding record of scientific achievement. They are among 13 new members, including six from the University of Washington, who will be inducted next month in Seattle.
Patients who are prescribed both opioids and sedating drugs are six times more likely to die of an overdose than people on opioids alone, according to researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health and the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries.
The UW Superfund Research Program received a five-year, $10 million award from the NIH to continue studying the effects that environmental pollutants pose to the nervous systems of humans and fish.
The University of Washington Center for One Health Research has played a major role in the development of a new set of guidelines for research in One Health, a growing field that looks at linkages between the health of people, animals, and the changing ecosystems we share.
Joel Kaufman, interim dean of the University of Washington School of Public Health, is lead author of the best environmental epidemiology paper published in 2016, according to the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE).
Researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health are using a newly developed panel of zebrafish genes and a rapid testing platform to identify chemicals that trigger oxidative stress. The method is cost-effective and can be performed more quickly and with less tissue than other methods, according to a research brief released May 3.
About 3,000 people gathered in Seattle on Sunday, June 11, to celebrate the largest graduating class ever from the University of Washington School of Public Health. Speaker Dr. Natalia Kanem, assistant secretary general of the United Nations (UN) and acting executive director of the UN’s Population Fund, called on graduates to unite in promotion of peace and social justice.
Rais Bhuiyan was shot in the face at point blank range by a self-described "Arab slayer" in the Dallas gas station where he worked. Six years later he tells his story during a Workers' Memorial Day event, hosted by the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences.
Richard Gleason’s many accomplishments over 20 years with SPH were recently recognized by the University of Washington. He will be receiving the UW's Distinguished Contributions to Lifelong Learning Award in June.
People living near heavily trafficked roadways may be at higher risk of heart disease due to fine particles in the air that lower levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), also known as “good” cholesterol, according to a new study from the University of Washington School of Public Health.
A new partnership with Boeing aims to bolster the School’s academic programs and improve the company’s talent pipeline.
UW TB delegation and icddr,b researchers outside of the hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh
World TB Day, celebrated each year on March 24 th , is an opportunity to raise awareness about the global burden of tuberculosis (TB). The 2017 World TB Day theme is “Unite to End TB,” and some faculty from the University of Washington (UW) embodied the work by creating a new partnership in Bangladesh.
Improving Veterinary Antimicrobial Practices Will Help Combat Growing Global Health Issue
Veterinarians play a key role in combating the global risk of antimicrobial resistance, say researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health. However, a new study shows that, while veterinarians are concerned about the threat of drug-resistant bugs, they face financial barriers to obtaining tests to guide therapy.
The National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is entering its third decade with seven new cross-sector councils to address industry-wide problems and promote improved practices in the workplace. The Immune, Infectious and Dermal Disease Prevention Cross-Sector Council includes two faculty from the University of Washington School of Public Health.
The Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center, directed by Richard Fenske at the University of Washington School of Public Health, received more than $9.2 million in grant funding from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Peter Johnson, a professor of environmental and occupational health sciences in the University of Washington School of Public Health, was invited to participate in the Transportation, Warehousing and Utilities Sector Council, which is part of the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA).
Hot weather can increase risk of agricultural worker injuries
Warmer weather is related to an increase in traumatic injuries for outdoor agricultural workers in central and eastern Washington. These findings, which appear October 7 in PLOS ONE, come from a study by researchers at the University of Washington and the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries’ SHARP Program. The study is the first to estimate the risk of traumatic injury in farmworkers using temperature data linked to the geographic location of the injury.
The UW School of Public Health was awarded more than $4.7 million on Wednesday by the National Institutes of Health to investigate how the environment influences neurodevelopment and asthma risk in children.
Professor Joel Kaufman, an internationally recognized expert in the relationship between environmental factors and cardiovascular disease, was named interim dean of the University of Washington School of Public Health.
SPH Outreach Manager Receives Lifetime Leadership Award
The International Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva Association recently announced Marilyn Hair (DEOHS) received the Jeannie Peeper Presidential Lifetime Leadership Award for her contributions to those in the rare disease community that have fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.
Gabino Junior Abarca, a third-year student, may have found his calling in environmental health through the Supporting Undergraduate Research Experiences in Environmental Health (SURE-EH) program offered by the department of environmental and occupational health sciences.
UW Professor Chairs EPA Panel to Review Nitrogen Oxides Standards
Lianne Sheppard from the University of Washington School of Public Health was selected to chair a 17-member committee that advises the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen. Sheppard is a professor of biostatistics and environmental and occupational health sciences.
The University of Washington received a $750,000 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop low-cost air pollution sensors to help Native American and Latino communities in the Yakima Valley reduce their exposure to wood smoke.
Howard Frumkin, dean of the UW School of Public Health, announced he will be stepping down in September.
The University of Washington School of Public Health issued a statement on Friday, July 15, calling for the UW to disengage from the prison industry, citing mass incarceration as a public health and moral crisis.
Labor unions, whose numbers are at historic lows in the U.S., help to build a culture of health in the workplace and beyond. They not only advocate for healthy and safe work environments, but they also improve the lives and promote the health of workers, their families, the community and public health. Jenn Hagedorn (HServ), Amy Hagopian (Hserv, GH) and Noah Seixas (DEOHS) are quoted.
10-Year Study Finds Air Pollution Accelerates Plaque Build-Up in Arteries to Heart
People living in areas with more outdoor pollution accumulate deposits in their coronary arteries faster than people living in less polluted areas, a new study finds.
University of Washington President Ana Mari Cauce on Tuesday invited the UW community and its partners to develop a vision for improving health and well-being around the world.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant to UW supports project conducted in partnership with South African team.
Keeping hospital workers safe: A hands-on simulation on April 6
Doctors and nurses were among the first people infected during the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa.  A potentially life-saving rehearsal is coming up April 6, in a course titled “Treating Patients with Highly Contagious Infectious Diseases: Using Technology to Advance Safety."
Top EPA Administrator Offers Plain Speaking and Practical Advice
In a speech and very practical conversation with UW public health, policy, and environmental students and faculty, Gina McCarthy, top Administrator for the US Environmental Protection Agency, exhorted students to learn "how to communicate to people about why what we do matters," and to stop using terms such as "risk reduction." The science is key, but you have to talk about it in human terms, she said.
Extreme Heat Increases Emergency Medical Service Calls for Workers
While temperatures in the Pacific Northwest are generally perceived as moderate, when heat events do occur, the area may be vulnerable. New findings from the University of Washington School of Public Health show increased risk for heat illness and dehydration on hotter days for the working-aged population between the ages of 15-64.
Photo of winners. Photo by Department of Ecology.
Staff in the University of Washington Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences were honored on Oct. 27, 2015 with a “Safer Chemistry Champion” award presented by the Washington Department of Ecology.
PhD Student Receives Bullitt Foundation Fellowship: To Launch One Health Dairy Project in Washington State
A PhD student at the University of Washington plans to tackle issues in sustainable dairy farming with funding from the Bullitt Foundation. Dr. Heather Fowler was selected for the Foundation’s Environmental Fellowship Award, a highly selective prize of $100,000 given to a single graduate student.
A new report highlights the health hazards faced by workers handling hydrofluoric acid in commercial car and truck washing operations.
UW event on April 29, 2015 to honor workers who died from job-related injuries or illnesses in Washington State
The Workers’ Memorial Day ceremony on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 will honor the 89 workers who died from job-related injuries or illnesses in Washington State last year. Thirteen of these fatalities were from King County.
PhRMA Foundation Presents Award in Excellence to Leading University of Washington Researcher
The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) Foundation awarded David L. Eaton, Ph.D., the PhRMA Foundation Award in Excellence in Pharmacology/Toxicology at the American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Annual Meeting in Boston.
Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in use, with more introduced every year. Scientists, however, have discerned the toxicity to human health for only a fraction of these, because the traditional method of testing is time-and cost-prohibitive. Thus, the need for high-capacity in vitro systems to screen chemicals for their potential health impacts is significant.
Scientists discuss search for safer chemicals at green toxicology workshop
Recognized leaders in chemistry, toxicology, ecotoxicology and other disciplines will guide participants through a two-day course April 23-24 to advance understanding of safer chemical design and formulation.
Simple swab test holds promise to ease tuberculosis detection
Drawing inspiration from veterinary medicine, researchers at the University of Washington have helped developed a new prospective approach to detect tuberculosis (TB) – easy-to-obtain oral swab samples, greatly improving on standard diagnostics.
Photo of Cynthia Curl. Photo credit: Adam Balinger
While health-conscious individuals understand the benefits of eating fresh fruits and veggies, they may not be aware of the volume of pesticides they could be ingesting with their vitamin C and fiber.

A study to be published in the Feb. 5 Environmental Health Perspectives is among the first to predict a person’s pesticide exposure based on information about their usual diet.
Heather Fowler. Photographer: Patricia L. McGiffert
Doctoral student Heather Fowler will be honored with a community service award on January 15 at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute event. The award honors individuals or groups who exemplify Martin Luther King’s principles.
Governor Tours South Park
Governor tours South Park, talks to residents and researchers on health impacts of climate change, traffic related air pollution
Zoobiquity traces animal, human health links Nov. 1

Like the canary in the coal mine, animals getting sick may hold an important message for people about shared environmental health risks.

The Zoobiquity 2014 Conference, "Human and Animal Health in a Changing Global Environment" Saturday, Nov. 1, in Seattle will bring together human, veterinary, and environmental medicine experts to explore the linkages and overlaps between these disciplines.

New tools for polio surveillance could aid eradication efforts
With grant funding made possible by the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, two new tools to help detect the poliovirus may soon strengthen global efforts to eradicate the disease. The foundation will invest up to US$5.3 million dollars in support of this goal.

Michael Yost named new Chair of the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences
Dean Howard Frumkin named Professor Michael Yost the new Chair of the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS), effective August 18, 2014. Professor Yost will succeed Professor David Kalman, who has been Chair of DEOHS for 16 years.
A logger, an electrician, and a firefighter are among the 14 men and women who died last year in King County from job-related injuries or illnesses. An event on April 25, 2014 organized by students at the University of Washington will honor these workers and the soldiers who have died.
Revitalization Task Force Needed, Researchers Conclude
A Health Impact Assessment (HIA) of EPA's Proposed Plan stresses that cleanup-related health issues should be addressed in context with broader existing problems faced by communities, Tribes and industry in the Duwamish Valley.
New Grand Challenge Study
A new study in Kenya led by Dr. Peter Rabinowitz in the UW School of Public Health will investigate whether children living in close proximity with domestic animals show evidence of sharing of gut microbes that can affect nutritional status.
UW Researchers Team Up with Neighborhood Residents to Measure Diesel Pollution in South Seattle

The residents of the Georgetown and South Park neighborhoods in Seattle’s Duwamish Valley now know how much diesel exhaust they are exposed to, thanks to the University of Washington School of Public Health and Puget Sound Sage, a nonprofit coalition in Seattle. A report on findings from the air pollution study are published online today.

CEEH Sponsors Public Forum on the Duwamish River Cleanup
The director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences joins local researchers, government officials, and industry experts at a Public Forum on the health impacts and pollution in the Duwamish, Seattle’s working river. Six short, lively ‘lightning’ presentations will be followed by an open microphone time for questions and discussion.
Contaminated diet contributes to phthalate and bisphenol A exposure
While water bottles may tout BPA-free labels and personal care products declare phthalates not among their ingredients, these assurances may not be enough. According to a study published February 27 in the Nature Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, we may be exposed to these chemicals in our diet and children may be most vulnerable.
Maternal exposure to outdoor air pollution associated with low birth weights worldwide
University of Washington, Battelle Scientists Identify Potential Early Biomarker for Autism Spectrum Disorder
University of Washington, Battelle Scientists Identify Potential Early Biomarker for Autism Spectrum Disorder: Breakthrough Could Help Autistic Children Receive Treatment Sooner
Public health has come a long way since the UW School of Public Health was founded in 1970, and we continue to make advances in such key areas as air and water quality, food safety and nutrition, disease prevention, workplace safety, and injury prevention.
Reproductive health providers should discuss environmental exposure risks with patients, says lead researcher Sheela Sathyanarayana. Published study includes simple recommendations to help reduce harmful exposures for women.
Duwamish Health Study in South Seattle to inform EPA's Final Cleanup Plan for Superfund Site
Press Release: A new project led by environmental health researchers will assess key health issues affecting people who use the Duwamish River or live nearby. Findings from the assessment will be provided to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to help inform their selection of a cleanup plan for the Lower Duwamish Waterway.
NIOSH awards $1.45 million to UW research center dedicated to farming, fishing and forestry safety and health, future funding still in limbo
NIOSH awards $1.45 million to UW research center dedicated to farming, fishing and forestry safety and health, future funding still in limbo
MRSA exposure for firefighters, medics greater than for general public: UW study
Firefighters and medics may be, perhaps not surprisingly, at a higher risk for carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) than the average person, according to results from a new study conducted by Marilyn Roberts, a University of Washington professor of environmental and occupational health sciences. Roberts, a microbiologist, recently conducted the first-ever environmental health study on MRSA in Northwest fire stations and on fire personnel to determine the extent of related contamination.
Unmute the commute: Senior health and public transit. DEOHS Affiliate Professor Andrew Dannenberg is quoted.
Washington researcher co-authors American Heart Association advisory on diet soda and health. DEOHS Associate Professor Jennifer Otten is quoted.
Hot days can trigger more workplace accidents. DEOHS Associate Professor June Spector is quoted.
Rollback of vehicle-emission standards threatens the health of vulnerable Washington residents. Op-ed by DEOHS Chair Michael Yost.
Smelly water: Fish losing their sense of smell. DEOHS Professor Evan Gallagher is quoted.
Washington researchers co-author report on common food additives that pose danger to kids. Doctoral student, Rachel Shaffer, and adjunct associate professor, Sheela Sathyanarayana, are quoted.
1 dead, 1 in critical condition from dry ice in Seattle car. Senior Lecturer, Martin Cohen is quoted.
Can you get sick from air conditioning? DEOHS Professor Scott Meschke is quoted.
Pediatricians group urges parents to avoid heating, storing food in plastic. Doctoral student, Rachel Shaffer, is quoted.
Safety, health, and wellness issues for women in construction trades
Understanding the impact of climate change on nutrition. DEOHS Professor Kristie Ebi is quoted.
What the recycling symbol on a plastic container can tell you about its potential dangers. DEOHS student Rachel Shaffer is quoted.
Help for when the heat gets in the way of sleep
Report: Common food additives may pose danger to kids
Workers can become dangerously overheated at temperatures below official limits. DEOHS Associate Professor June Spector is quoted.
Beating the heat, for your health. Features research by DEOHS Lecturer Tania Busch Isaksen.
Does Yakima Valley agriculture trigger asthma? Study aims to find out. Features research led by DEOHS Professor Catherine Karr.
Everything we know about e-cigarettes so far. DEOHS Professor David Eaton is quoted.
In India, experts look to climate trends to tackle malnutrition. DEOHS Professor Kristie Ebi is quoted.

Janitors have one of the highest on-the-job injury rates of any workers. Debra Milek, adjunct associate professor and medical director of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Clinic at Harborview, is quoted.  
Dairy farms battle environmentalists over manure. Professor Catherine Karr is quoted.
Architecture for health is not just for healthcare architects. Editorial co-authored by Andrew Dannenberg, DEOHS affiliate professor.
Catherine Karr: improving paediatric respiratory health.
Rice, the staple food of billions, could become less nutritious because of climate change. DEOHS Professor Kristie Ebi is quoted.
Germs at the airport, and the teams that fight them. DEOHS Professor Marilyn Roberts is quoted.
Is biking a Catch-22 situation? DEOHS student Rachel Shaffer weighs the pros and cons of biking in dirty air.
A prescription for better health: Go outside. DEOHS Professor Howard Frumkin is quoted.
Four UW faculty tapped for UN climate assessment. DEOHS faculty members Kristie Ebi and Jeremy Hess are quoted.
Air pollution exposure in the womb linked to higher blood pressure in kids. Interim dean and DEOHS Professor Joel Kaufman is quoted.
Prescription opioids highly addictive, especially for teens. DEOHS Research Professor Gary Franklin is quoted.
Effort to combat lead in Washington is 'not adequately resourced.' DEOHS Professor Catherine Karr is quoted.
Hilary Godwin named dean of the School of Public Health
Hilary Godwin named dean of the School of Public Health
Livable City Year, co-led by DEOHS Assistant Professor Jen Otten, was recognized for its work to improve sustainability and livability in local communities.
WA state health officials: 5 people sick from E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce.
WA state health officials: 5 people sick from E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce.
The EPA is jeopardizing scientific research and privacy in the name of "transparency." Interim Dean and Professor Joel Kaufman is quoted.
UW breaks ground on new population health building. Features DEOHS student Gabino Abarca.
For farmworkers' kids, country air means dust, pesticides and asthma. DEOHS Professor Catherine Karr is featured.
DEOHS faculty members selected as author, editor of international report on climate change.
Emerging contaminants may affect Puget Sound chinook salmon, UW researchers find. Evan Gallagher is quoted.
US environment agency pushes to limit its use of non-public data. Interim Dean and Professor Joel Kaufman is quoted.
DEOHS Associate Professor Edmund Seto wins $100,000 grant to expand air study into Tijuana, Mexico.
What chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease can teach us about humans. Peter Rabinowitz is quoted.
Puget Sound salmon take in human drugs, which may hurt their survival. Features DEOHS-led research.
Myths about the Washington state lottery--features Gabino Abarca, DEOHS senior and student research scientist.
How Texas is ‘building back better’ from Hurricane Harvey
Animal sentinels are sounding the alert. Are we listening?
Air pollutant reviews stalled; EPA advisers haven’t met in months. DEOHS Professor and Assistant Chair Lianne Sheppard is quoted.
DEOHS Research Professor Gary Franklin: Opioid overprescribing is not a myth.
How big data (and family ties) will shape the future of health. DEOHS Professor Howard Frumkin is quoted.
Opioids are no better than common painkillers, study finds. Gary Franklin, DEOHS research professor, is quoted.
What is our changing climate doing to human health? Our UW Center for Health and the Global Environment is one of the only research centers of its kind measuring impact and testing solutions.
Is jet traffic at Sea-Tac Intl Airport affecting the health of people living nearby? DEOHS researchers are measuring particles emitted by jet engines at Sea-Tac Intl Airport to explore possible health hazards.
DEOHS student Sonni Tadlock helped develop an environmental health curriculum with the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community teaching youth and the community about living seasonally.
An expert committee, led by DEOHS Professor David Eaton, found that using electronic cigarettes may lead youth to start smoking regular cigarettes, but is helpful for adult smokers trying to kick the habit.
Report co-authored by two DEOHS faculty shows need for smarter occupational health surveillance system.
DEOHS Lecturer Nicole Errett: The need for disaster research—and underrepresented scholars to plan and execute it—has never been greater.
The Center for Health and the Global Environment, or CHanGE, is working at the forefront of understanding and managing environmental threats to ensure healthy, productive lives for all. One of the few university research centers of its kind, the center is a partnership between the Departments of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and of Global Health, bridging the UW Schools of Public Health and of Medicine.
Janitors/custodians suffer more on-the-job injuries than construction laborers. DEOHS Professor Debra Milek discusses the effort to study and address ergonomic problems contributing to injuries for UW's custodial staff in Washington state's L&I blog.
Professor Andrew Dannenberg is the guest blogger on APHA's Public Health News Wire. He discusses the interconnectedness of the built environment, climate change, and public health, as well as the benefits of partnering between health and non-health sectors to minimize the effects of climate change.
The atmosphere is literally changing the food we eat, for the worse. Kristie Ebi, [has] studied the intersection of climate change and global health for two decades, is one of a handful of scientists in the U.S. who is keyed into the potentially sweeping consequences of the CO2-nutrition dynamic, and brings it up in every talk she gives.
As governments decide what to do about air quality, studies connect an array of health problems to dirty air. Joel Kaufman is quoted.
In the Imperial Valley, nearly 3,000 homes are dependent on raw canal water for showering, washing and other household uses. State regulators sanction the arrangement, but others are concerned about health risks. Vanessa Galaviz is quoted.
Nicole Errett, from the University of Washington School of Public Health, received a 12-month, $50,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to study how state policies for disaster recovery planning promote health and well-being.
KUOW’s Bill Radke spoke with Sverre Vedal, a pulmonary physician at the UW who studies the effects of air pollution at the School of Public Health, about what the wildfire smoke in Seattle means for our health.
A new study suggests India will see more suicide deaths as climate change brings hotter temperatures that damage crops and exacerbate drought. Howard Frumkin in quoted.
Six scientists and engineers from the University of Washington have been elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences. New members include Joel Kaufman and Howard Frumkin. Shirley Beresford was elected to the society's Board.
Dangerous chemicals tied to cancer, problems in pregnancy and child development issues are found in drinking water across the country, according to a new report. Scott Meschke says, "filters don't remove everything."
The most obvious effect of global warming is not a doomsday scenario. Extreme heat is happening today, and wreaking havoc on vulnerable bodies. Howard Frumkin is quoted.
A recent New York Times story raised concerns about tosic chemicals in mac cheese but missed some key facts, according to a new article in Slate. Sheela Sathyanarayana is quoted.
Roundup has revolutionized farming. Now, human health and Bayer’s $66 billion deal for Monsanto depend on an honest appraisal of its safety. Lianne Sheppard is quoted. 
Potentially harmful chemicals, called phthalates, that were banned from children’s toys a decade ago may still be present in high concentrations in your child’s favorite meal: macaroni and cheese mixes made with powdered cheese. Sheela Sathyanarayana is quoted.
Roundup has revolutionized farming. Now, human health and Bayer’s $66 billion deal for Monsanto depend on an honest appraisal of its safety. Lianne Sheppard is quoted.
Seattle Times op-ed by DEOHS alumna Julie Marks: Gutting environmental protections will not ‘make America great’.
Researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health are using a newly developed panel of zebrafish genes and a rapid testing platform to identify chemicals that trigger oxidative stress. The method is cost-effective and can be performed more quickly and with less tissue than other methods, according to a research brief released May 3.
Deadly heat waves—already a risk for 30 percent of the world's population—will spread around the globe, posing a danger for 74 percent of people on Earth by the end of this century if nothing is done to address climate change. Howard Frumkin and Jeremy Hess were quoted.
The International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE) has awarded its prize for the Best Environmental Epidemiology Paper published in 2016 to Kaufman and coauthors' Lancet Article “Association between air pollution and coronary artery calcification within six metropolitan areas in the USA."
President Donald Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris Accord climate change agreement was derided by environmentalists who said abandoning the agreement would be a devastating setback to global efforts to combat climate change. Howard Frumkin is quoted.
Air pollution alone is responsible for 7 million deaths a year, according to the World Health Organization, and now a new study from the UW School of Public Health has found that air pollution may be a predictor of poor sleep. This insight comes from data gathered in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, or MESA, which is a project led by Interim Dean Joel Kaufman.
People living near heavily trafficked roadways may be at higher risk of heart disease due to fine particles in the air that lower levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), also known as “good” cholesterol, according to a new study from the University of Washington School of Public Health.
Forty years ago, feline hyperthyroidism was virtually nonexistent. Now it’s an epidemic — and some scientists think a class of everyday chemicals might be to blame. Peter Rabinowitz is quoted.
Some airline crews say getting on a plane could make you sick. KIRO 7 News investigates reports of dangerous fumes on board planes. Clement Furlong was interviewed.
According to the CDC, about 75% of newly emerging diseases and 60% of all known human infectious diseases originate in animals, which can serve as sentinels to warn us of illnesses. Addressing human, animal and environmental health systems, and recognizing how they are related, also can help guide antimicrobial stewardship. All of this falls under the One Health approach. Peter Rabinowitz is quoted in this cover story.
A cluster of opioid addicts in Massachusetts suddenly lost their memories, and no one knows why. Max Meehan was case number one. Gary Franklin is quoted.
Adults who were exposed to traffic-related air pollution had lower levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol that could increase their cardiovascular disease risk, according to an epidemiological study. Griffith Bell, an alumni from the Department of Epidemiology, is mentioned. Joel Kaufman was co-author of the study.
More than 750,000 people die prematurely from dirty air every year that is generated by making goods in one location that will be sold elsewhere. Some of those deaths are a result of air pollution that has blown across national borders. Howard Frumkin is quoted.
The community-based study, for “Home Air in Agriculture — Pediatric Intervention,” is aimed at children who live within 400 meters of crop production or dairy operations in the Yakima Valley. Catherine Karr is mentioned.
Heavy rains and a malfunction at the West Point Plant forced King County to dump million of gallons of raw sewage into Puget Sound. Experts say that climate change can continue to bring heavier rainstorms that overwhelm today's wasterwater infrastructure. Scott Meschke is quoted.
Howard Frumkin discusses the ways research has connected improvements in public health with access to green spaces, parks and recreation.
Women exposed to certain chemicals in flooring and food packaging early in pregnancy are more likely to have decreased free testosterone—hormones vital for fetal growth, according to a new study. Lead author Sheela Sathyanarayana is quoted.
Pilots across the country are raising a major safety concern, claiming that the air that flight crews and passengers breathe on board planes could contain toxic fumes. Clement Furlong is quoted.
Kristie Ebi co-authored a recently published report summarizing the first 25 years of accomplishments by the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). Established by the Global Research Act of 1990, the USGCRP has provided strategic planning and coordination to 13 participating federal agencies working to advance the science of global environmental change.
Two NIEHS grantees have received the prestigious Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). Catherine Karr was among 102 recipients honored in 2017.
Through a partnership with the California Environmental Health Tracking Program, University of Washington, and with funding from the National Institutes of Health, California's Imperial Valley Air Quality Control project installed 40 air quality monitors throughout the valley and set up a website to gather pollution information and community-generated reports. Edmund Seto is quoted.
In any shared shower facility, you're going to find the the obvious post-workout body detritus—sweat, skin cells, clumps of hair. A recent survey found 62 percent of people pee in the shower on a regular basis. Some environmental activists encourage this as a way to conserve water and cut down on toilet paper use. But just how gross is it to forego footwear in the locker room? Vice asked Marilyn Roberts.
The future is expected to hold more deadly heat waves, the fast spread of certain infectious diseases and catastrophic food shortages. These events could cause premature deaths -- and they're all related to climate change, according to a panel of experts who gathered at the Carter Center in Atlanta on Feb. 16 for the Climate & Health Meeting. Howard Frumkin is quoted.
Catherine Karr, professor of pediatrics in the UW School of Medicine and of environmental and occupational health sciences in the UW School of Public Health, was among the 102 recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, announced by the White House during President Obama's final days in office.

Some of the health risks of inhaling fine and ultrafine particles are well-established, such as asthma, lung cancer, and, most recently, heart disease. But a growing body of evidence suggests that exposure can also harm the brain, accelerating cognitive aging, and may even increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Lianne Sheppard is quoted.
Sophie the Giraffe, a teething toy designed for children 18 months and under, is the latest item geared toward babies that is under fire by parents who discovered mold inside the toy’s cavity. Experts talk to Healthline about these reports and what parents can do to keep their kids healthy. Sheela Sathyanarayana is quoted.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it recently postponed a gathering it had planned to hold next month on the effects of climate change on health. The Climate Change and Health Summit was organized to bring scientists and public-health practitioners together to discuss implementing climate-related health initiatives. Howard Frumkin, former director of the CDC Center for Environmental Health, was quoted.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has canceled a conference next month on climate change and health. The Climate Change and Health Summit was organized to bring scientists and public-health practitioners together to discuss implementing climate-related health initiatives. Kristie Ebi, a professor in Global Health and in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, is quoted.
Despite significant improvements in the last 25 years, U.S. construction workers are still at high risk for on-the-job injuries to muscles, tendons, joints and nerves, a new study reports. June Spector, who was not involved with the study, was quoted.
The NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) FEST was held from Dec. 5-8 in Durham, North Carolina. In the opening plenary session, SPH's Joel Kaufman shared epidemiological evidence linking air pollution with cardiovascular disease, especially heart attacks and strokes.
Veterinarians play a key role in combatting the global risk of antimicrobial resistance, say researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health. However, a new study shows that, while veterinarians are concerned about the threat of drug-resistant bugs, they face financial barriers to obtaining tests to guide therapy.
Pacific island countries are among the most vulnerable in the world to the current and future health risks of climate change, according to a group of international researchers that includes Kristie Ebi from the UW School of Public Health.
Assembled to review evidence of whether glyphosate is a human carcinogen, the members of a Scientific Advisory Panel of the Environmental Protection Agency offered opinions on EPA's conclusion that the active ingredient in Roundup, the world's most widely used herbicide, is “not likely to be carcinogenic to humans.” Lianne Shepard is quoted.
Critics say the answer pharmaceutical companies are pushing to address the ongoing opioid crisis boosts their profits while forcing taxpayers to shoulder the costs. Gary Franklin is quoted.
Smog-filled cityscapes have become a common scene around the world, a problem that some metropolises have battled for decades. Four mayors from major cities – Paris, Mexico City, Madrid and Athens – recently decided to take a drastic action: They want to eliminate all diesel vehicles from their roads by 2025. Interim Dean Joel Kaufman is quoted.
Pesticide exposure may change the makeup of bacteria in the mouths of farm workers, a new UW study led by Ian Stanaway and Elaine Faustman finds.
Hot days can be deadly, so public health officials seek to mitigate their effects through heat action plans. These plans have been widely adopted, but little is known about how effective they really are at reducing the public health burden of high temperatures. Kristie Ebi was quoted.
PhD student Karen Michael authored a blog about her research on C. difficile.
To measure the impact of pesticides on farmworkers, a team of scientists at the UW that included Ian Stanaway and Elaine Faustman collected oral swabs from adults living and working in the Yakima Valley.
Howard Frumkin and a veteran who served in Iraq share their views on the healing power of the outdoors.
Students in Andrew Dannenberg and Fritz Wagner's Health Impact Assessment graduate course studied the health impacts of the City of Anacortes' South Commercial Avenue beautification project and will present to the city council on their findings.
A new study finds signs of a tough bacteria at a hospital laundry facility. Cites research by Marilyn Roberts.
Rachel Shaffer and Steven Gilbert talk about workplace lead on Diane Horn’s Sustainability Segment of Mind Over Matters and why it matters.
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is giving the University of Washington $210 million to support what the school calls a “population health initiative.”
A newly published study tracks how levels of a few hazardous pesticides linger in the air throughout the spray season. The results, not surprisingly, show that people who live very close to farms have higher levels of pesticides in and around their homes than people who live further away. Cites research by Jenna Gibbs.
Tiny pollution particles produced by vehicle engines and industry are known to worsen heart disease and raise the risk of stroke, but a new study suggests they might also be planting the seeds for cardiovascular disease early on. Interim Dean Joel Kaufman is quoted.
William Daniell helped lead a UW study that resulted in a call-to-action for cleaning up lead contamination in Dong Mai village, a lead battery recycling center in northern Vietnam.
UW Alzheimer disease researchers and epidemiologists have combined forces to identify the effect of air pollution on memory and dementia risk. They will leverage 30 years of data from a "living learning laboratory of aging" at the UW. Dr.Liannne Sheppard is quoted.
Peter Johnson and others explain how to minimize exposure to whole body vibration on bus drivers to reduce negative health effects.
To reduce bacteria buildup, Marilyn Roberts advises to launder towel frequently, dry it completely between use, and don't share if you are sick.
California's border with Baja California is a complex region with unique environmental issues. The San Ysidro Air Quality and Border Traffic Study, co-led by Edmund Seto, is referenced.
Marilyn Roberts talks about germs that may be found on loofah and other bathroom scrubbers.
Indonesian forest fires that choked a swath of Southeast Asia with a smoky haze for weeks last year may have caused more than 100,000 deaths, according to new research that will add to pressure on Indonesia's government to tackle the annual crisis. Dean Howard Frumkin is quoted.
Miami Beach’s efforts to control Zika-carrying mosquitoes have been challenged over the past two weeks by residents worried about possible adverse health effects of the pesticide naled. Richard Fenske is quoted.
Rachel Shaffer and Steven Gilbert urge in this op-ed that US standards on lead exposure in the workplace need to be updated to protect workers and their families.
In this op-ed, global health students Tara Ness and Brianne Rowan argue for an expansion of targeted screening in children for lead exposure and a national lead poisoning surveillance system.
Climate change is a public health issue, and physicians should be aware of the potential medical consequences and be able to communicate those to patients. Joel Kaufman is quoted.
Catherine Karr of the University of Washington School of Public Health received a $750,000 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop low-cost air pollution sensors in rural Washington state.
Sheela Sathyanarayana says mold isn’t usually that bad, but it can be. Schools aren’t required to routinely test for mold.
Marilyn Hair received the Jeannie Peeper Presidential Lifetime Leadership Award for her contributions to those in the rare disease community that have fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.
For the first time, every doctor in the United States will receive a letter from the US surgeon general urging them to curb use of opioids and providing tips on prescribing the drugs. Gary Franklin is quoted.
City leaders and emergency responders across the country are trying to figure out how to keep people safe during more frequent and intense heat waves, and how to cool urban cores. Tania Busch Isaksen is quoted.
Heritage University and the University of Washington will partner on a project to combat wood smoke pollution. Catherine Karr leads the UW team.
The SURE-EH program directed by Lianne Sheppard aims to increase the diversity of people studying and working in environmental health. UW undergraduates conduct their own environmental health research project with a faculty mentor.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a $749,999 grant to the UW to develop low-cost air pollution sensor technology and help communities learn about their local air quality.
Driving a truck long hours can take a toll on the body. Cab seats being developed better address driver health and comfort concerns. Peter Johnson is quoted.
Reducing vibrations before they reach the seat of the driver will provide a smoother ride. Peter Johnson is quoted.
Researchers are a step closer to answering an important question about the health risks of climate change: Are people acclimatizing to higher global temperatures? A new study suggests that people can adapt to gradual increases in average global temperatures, though whether that adaptability can be sustained with the advance of climate change is yet unanswered.
Students in the Construction Management Occupational Safety and Health 18-month master's degree program also receive public health training. David Kalman directs a training grant that financially supports up to three students in the program.
A new paper co-authored by Kristie Ebi answers an important question about the health risks of climate change: Are people acclimatizing to higher global temperatures?
Industries with high potential for lead exposure, including construction put workers at elevated risk of lead poisoning, write Rachel Shaffer and Steven Gilbert in an op-ed.
A federal grant given to Yakima County will address lead hazards for some of the community’s most vulnerable families. Catherine Karr is quoted
State regulators suspended the medical license of a Seattle pain doctor to protect patients from harm. Gary Franklin--medical director for L&I--is quoted.
Peter Rabinowitz talks about his research in this podcast on fracking.
Brazil's struggle to curb pollution and upgrade Rio de Janeiro's slums ahead of the 2016 Summer Olympics highlights the difficulty of protecting the respiratory health of the estimated 1 billion people living in unplanned urban settlements around the world. Joel Kaufman is quoted.
Air pollution is a health risk for people in communities across the United States. Study led by Joel Kaufman is referenced.
Lianne Sheppard was selected to chair a 17-member committee that advises the EPA on air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen.
Faculty Peter Johnson and June Spector share tips for better posture on the job.
A new paper coauthored by researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health documents how a systematic healthcare simulation can help develop clinical care protocols to identify safety threats while caring for infectious patients.
If the U.S. healthcare sector were ranked as a nation, it would be the world’s 13th-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, more than all of the UK, a new study finds. Dean Howard Frumkin, who wasn’t involved in the current study, commended it for shining a light on healthcare pollution.
What does the MESA Air study mean for outdoor athletes? Professor Joel Kaufman, a bicycle commuter, explains.
Parts of Arizona and Southern California,had record-shattering temperatures. Kristie Ebi, is quoted.
The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration has started the process for a potential — and some argue long overdue — Noise in Construction standard. Richard Gleason is quoted.
Nearly a decade after the smartphone’s arrival, evidence of tech-caused digital disabilities is emerging. Debra Milek warns that "discomfort may be an early indicator of future injury" when using devices.
The overall findings from the MESA Air study "support the case for global efforts of pollution reduction in prevention of cardiovascular diseases."
PhD student Rachel Shaffer was featured on NPR as part of Joe's Big Idea.
Prince’s death was caused by an accidental overdose of the powerful opioid drug fentanyl. Gary Franklin is quoted
Sheela Sathyanarayana shares tips – think sun-protective clothing, and lotion or stick sunscreen – for staying safe in the hot Seattle summer sun.
Scientists are using DNA to identify fish and other marine creatures by scrutinizing DNA flecks, a new technique that promises to help scientists keep better track of rare or endangered marine species. Jesse Port (PhD, 2012) is quoted.
A new 10-year UW study links living with air pollution to serious heart disease.
Joel Kaufman talks about findings from 10-year MESA Air study.
Researchers at the University of Washington discuss whether a decline in pollution levels is enough to no longer pose a major threat to children who are particularly sensitive to poor air quality. Professors Joel Kaufman and Sverre Vedal from DEOHS are quoted.
EPA's Office of Research and Development calls the MESA Air study led by Joel Kaufman "extraordinary."
A 10-year study led by Joel Kaufman found that people living in areas with more outdoor pollution —even at lower levels common in the United States — accumulate deposits in the arteries that supply the heart faster than do people living in less polluted areas.
Joel Kaufman says study results show "linkage between air pollution and actual evidence of progression of atherosclerosis."
Scientists have known for years that long-term exposure to air pollution raises the risk of heart disease, but a highly anticipated study led by a Joel Kaufman finally explains why.
Lead house paint that dates from before the 1978 federal ban is the No. 1 source of lead poisoning of children in the United States, and children who live in older homes can be exposed through peeling paint. Catherine Karr, DEOHS, is quoted.
Experts say that rust on pots and pans won't likely cause harm. James Woods says better to play it safe and buy new cookware.
Residents of an area of California plagued by air quality issues are partnering with local organizations, UW researchers and others to test air pollution using low-cost air monitors. An interactive GIS map will translate the data into alerts for families, schools, and local leaders.
A 16-year-old Central Washington boy was exposed to high levels of lead from a strange source: sheepskin rugs he slept with at night. Catherine Karr , who treated the boy, said it's unusual to see levels this high in the U.S.
Several chemicals in pliable plastic can leach into your food when you heat it. Sheela Sathyanarayana is quoted.
Researchers found that wastewater in Puget Sound contained Valium, Zoloft, OxyContin, caffeine, nicotine fungicides, and antiseptics. UW research is cited.
Researchers are looking at how occupational health factors into mental health outcomes for veterinarians. Peter Rabinowitz, Heather Fowler, and the training program in Occupational Health at the Human-Animal Interface are mentioned.
Experts weigh in about lead suspected in Tacoma's drinking water. Catherine Karr explains the heath effects from lead exposures, particularly in children.
An event at the UW raised awareness about the importance of job safety. Nancy Simcox, who directs the continuing education programs in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, is interviewed.
The border expansion between the US and Mexico has heightened health concerns among San Ysidro residents. So residents, led by Casa Familiar, have obtained funding from CalEPA to do their own air-pollution study. Edmund Seto is involved in the project.
A tougher federal rule on silica exposure will take effect in June. Noah Seixas explains how workers can get exposed when they cut or grind concrete or stone.
Around 450,000 cases of active TB are diagnosed in South Africa each year. A new funded study led by Gerard Cangelosi will evaluate a simple swab of the patient’s mouth against the current diagnosis method that uses sputum.
Living closer to nature is better for your health, new research suggests — and may even extend your life. Dean Howard Frumkin is quoted on the power of "Vitamin N."
Concerned about their neighborhood's proximity to the world's busiest land port of entry, a community development agency is teaming up with San Diego State and the University of Washington School of Public Health on a study to analyze the health risks associated with air pollution at the border.
Experts say climate change could devastate human health, the economy and national security, making the world a more dangerous place to live and widening the gap between the rich and the poor. Howard Frumkin talks about consequences to human health.
Deadly toxin levels are linked to fast food consumption. According to Sheela Sathyanarayana, children are more likely to be exposed to these toxins than anyone else.
Dramatic improvements in air quality in U.S. cities since the 1990s may not be enough to ensure normal lung function in children, according to new research. Cora Sack and Joel Kaufman--who coauthored an editorial in the same journal where the results appeared--are quoted.
Manufacturers advertise premium bottled waters in the US as a more hydrating, healthful version of water than what flows from the tap. But leading experts say that's not true. Gretchen Onstad is quoted.
The just-released CDC guidelines on opioid prescriptions for chronic pain resemble the Washington state guidelines that Gary Franklin and others at the UW helped develop.
A UC Berekley study saw a significant drop in levels of chemicals found in teenagers who wore makeup and lotions without parabens and phalates. Sheela Sathyanarayana is quoted.
The Obama administration issued a report outlining major threats to public health from climate change; Dean Howard Frumkin is quoted.
Getting up from a chair once posed a challenge. Now Steven Gilbert walks more than five miles a day with the help of an implanted device.
The state Department of Ecology show chances are dangerously high that some kids' dresses adorned with jewelry are loaded with toxic metals. Steven Gilbert is quoted.
Lucio Costa has found out how one of a now-banned class of flame retardants called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) exerts its toxic effects.
The Oregonian has taken dozens of soil samples from Portland neighborhoods located in hot spots for toxic pollution. Catherine Karr is quoted.
Stephanie Chan (MPH, 2011) led a study that found that long-term air pollution exposures are associated with higher blood pressure, potentially explaining the increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in previous air pollution studies.
Care with multifaceted interventions may reduce the all-cause mortality risk for patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Gary Franklin comments on the study.
A recent survey showing “slight improvement” in air pollution releases from Yakima County dairies isn’t easing the concerns of neighbors and environmentalists. Catherine Karr is quoted.
Testing in WA state for at-risk children lags behind other states, Crosscut reports. Affiliate Professor Steven Gilbert is quoted.
Potential safety hazards from a proposed methanol plant in Tacoma has people concerned. David Eaton is quoted.
An op-ed on exposures to air pollutants from large animal feeding operations cites a University of Washington study led by Catherine Karr.
The factors leading to the current Zika outbreak won't be clear for some time, but environmental health experts say there's a good chance such infectious diseases will become more common as the global climate warms. Kristie Ebi is quoted.
Climate change may be one of the factors in the spread of the insect-borne diseases like Zika. Kristie Ebi is quoted.
Megan Cartwright (PhD, Environmental Toxicology, 2015) argues that lead pipes in Flint, Michigan, signal a larger problem--limiting children's exposure to lead, which can come from a variety of sources.
University scientists have a formidable record of accomplishment in the field of climate-change research, but they haven’t figured out how to stop it. Dean Howard Frumkin is quoted.
Urban planners at UW hope to increase campus walkability by adapting the built environment. Andrew Dannenberg is quoted.
Steven Gilbert was recognized by the Society of Toxicology with its Public Communications Award for broadening the public’s understanding of toxicological issues.
Students in our department enroll in a class designed to help them recognize potential health and safety hazards in industries by visiting work sites.
Kristie Ebi reports on the recent UN conference on climate change in Paris.
The University of Washington College of Built Environments and School of Public Health have been selected as part of a national initiative seeking to translate research on how design impacts public health into architectural practice.
Dean Howard Frumkin is quoted on the importance of public health advisories for cities such as Delhi with high air pollution levels.
A study led by June Spector found that orchard workers paid by piece rate rather than hourly were at increased risk of heat illness.
A new report co-authored by Tania Busch Isaksen projects dramatic changes in the Puget Sound region due to climate change; an entire chapter is devoted to the potential effect on human health.
Scientists warned of the "epidemic potential" of deadly and fast-spreading bacteria resistant to last-line antibiotics. Professor Marilyn Roberts is quoted.
With funding from a Bullitt Foundation Fellowship, Heather Fowler is preparing for a career in a new field of "veterinary industrial hygiene."
A new report by the University of Washington synthesizes relevant research about the future of the Puget Sound region and what to expect in the coming decades, and how best to prepare for that future. Tania Busch Isaksen is one of the authors.
Marilyn Roberts talks about what may be lurking in bed sheets. She recommends changing them at least once a week, and more often if there are bodily secretions or any potential risk factors.
A new report by the University of Washington synthesizes all the relevant research about the future of the Puget Sound region to paint a picture of what to expect in the coming decades, and how best to prepare for that future. Tania Busch Isaksen is one of the co-authors.
Studies find common indoor air pollutants--including semivolatile phthalates--enter the body through skin. John Kissel is quoted.
Michael Yost talks about the danger to the type of laser allegedly shined at two ferry captains, causing eye injuries.
To address the increasing need to create and sustain healthy, equitable urban communities, tour department is offering a new interdisciplinary MPH and Master of Urban Planning (MUP) concurrent degree program.
The heat index may reach 170 degrees in parts of the Persian Gulf if carbon dioxide emissions continue at their current pace, a new study says. Dean Howard Frumkin is quoted.
Replacing old engines that work the industrial shoreline is part of a bigger effort to clean up the Duwamish River. But critics say it's not happening fast enough. Joel Kaufman, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
Andrew Dannenberg presented at a health policy forum in Kentucky on how community-driven planning influences health equity and health-promoting environments.
Air pollution plays a role in the development of heart disease and in triggering cardiac events. Joel Kaufman talks about the latest research and offers tips to reduce risk.
A pervasive cloud of dust is just the latest health hazard to threaten the residents of the largely industrial neighborhood, Seattle Weekly writes. Research from the UW and Puget Sound Sage is cited.
An asthmatic sea otter at the Seattle Aquarium illustrates the 'One Health' connection between animals, humans and the environment, says Associate Professor Peter Rabinowitz.
Pesticide use in homes may increase the risk of children developing leukemia or lymphoma, a new report suggests. Catherine Karr is quoted.
For the first time, the semi-annual event for people experiencing homelessness offered free services for pets, too. Gemina Garland-Lewis helped arrange the animal-care side of the event.
Clem Furlong and his team are developing a blood test to show what's really happening in the body after a "fume event" on board a plan. Furlong is an adjunct professor of environmental and occupational health sciences.
Recent fire-derived air pollution has been the worst in recent memory. Catherine Karr, associate professor and director of the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, is interviewed about health issues for some local residents.
PATH and a team led by Scott Meschke have developed an all-in-one sampling kit and a processing tool to streamline testing. They are working with polio laboratories in Kenya and Pakistan to validate the performance of a new sewage-sampling kit.
Hydrofluoric acid can cause serious burns to exposed skin, according to new research published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Carolyn Whitaker (MS, Environmental Health-Industrial Hygiene '01) is quoted. Carly Eckert (MPH, Epidemiology '14) and David Bonauto took part in the research.
Study indicates that opioid overdoses appear to frequently occur in patients who are not chronic users with high prescribed doses of opioids, in contrast to the patient groups targeted by current opioid prescribing guidelines. Deborah Fulton-Kehoe, the study's lead author, is quoted.
Steven Gilbert talks to the host of Toxic Free Talk Radio about indoor and outdoor air pollution.
An interview with Professor John Kissel, who served on an Institute of Medicine panel that was asked to decide whether Air Force reservists who did not serve in Vietnam had been exposed to Agent Orange residue in C-123 aircraft.
With oil-train traffic increasing, governments know they have to be prepared for the worst. Instructor John Malool is training communities on how to handle accidents.
The active suspension truck seat made by Bose Corporation is profiled, and Peter Johnson talks about whole body vibration and how it contributes to back and neck pain.
Overdoses of opioid pain medications frequently occur in people who are prescribed low doses and who aren’t chronic users, according to a study led by Deborah Fulton-Kehoe and published in the August issue of Medical Care.
People who are active outside for sports or work should take care to avoid heat exhaustion in warm as well as hot weather. June Spector explains why.
The papal encyclical and the Lancet Commission report are reframing the climate issue, putting people at its center, write Dean Howard Frumkin and Stephen V. Sundborg, president of Seattle University.
PhD student Megan Cartwright explains why health officials are grappling with increasing outbreaks of Cryptosporidium. She is a 2015 Mass Media Fellow with the American Association of the Advancement of Science.
Janice Camp received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Pacific Northwest Section of the American Industrial Hygiene Association.
As long as polio is present in the world, outbreaks are still a risk. A bag-mediated filtration system developed in Scott Meschke's laboratory is being deployed in Kenya for polio surveillance.
Dean Howard Frumkin discusses how transit infrastructure, land use policy and public health investments help create a healthier city.
The sphere of public health is low-hanging fruit for veterinarians considering a transition out of clinical practice, says Heather Fowler, a PhD student in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences.
The Department of Veterans Affairs now says Air Force reservists who became ill after being exposed to Agent Orange residue while working on planes after the Vietnam War should be eligible for disability benefits. The reversal in policy came after an Institute of Medicine report co-authored by John Kissel.
Pioneers of the One Health movement to blend human, veterinary and environmental health are gaining respect, epidemic by epidemic, but capturing the attention of the human health care establishment remains a challenge. Peter Rabinowitz and Heather Fowler are quoted.
Tony Gomez (BS, '84), manager of injury prevention for Public Health - Seattle and King County, says life jackets probably would have saved eight of the nine people who drowned in open water last year.
Environmental health is an underappreciated component of primary care, including pediatrics, and many providers do not have the training. Catherine Karr is one of the physicians working to rectify this situation.
Research scientist Tania Busch Isaksen, one of several experts consulted, says heat waves will kill and hospitalize an increasing number of people in King County.
Avian influenza has led to the destruction of 40 million chickens and turkeys in the United States. It underscores the close relationship between human and animal health, said Peter Rabinowitz, who studies the links between human, animal and environmental health.
Steven Gilbert talks to the host of Toxic Free Talk Radio about a large class of chemicals known as “VOCs.”
Alumna Cynthia Curl was selected for the Institute of Translational Health Sciences "Rising Stars" program to help promising, early-stage investigators.
Drama--a certified therapy animal--was invited to Peter Rabinowitz's One Health class, as part of a lesson on the human-animal bond. PhD student Heather Fowler helps run the course.
At least 20 people have come down with salmonella infections linked to contact with crested geckos bought at pet stores. Peter Rabinowitz talks about ways to minimize the risk of illness from pets.
Two recent studies show that hot weather in King County is associated with adverse health outcomes, including hospitalization and death.
In a pilot study, researchers are looking at the overall fitness and health risks faced by gillnet fishermen along Alaska's Copper River, famous for its salmon.
Two studies led by Tania Busch Isaksen make clear the dangers of King County's hottest days on vulnerable populations.
More workers suffered electric shocks or burns at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power in 2014 than in any of the previous 10 years. Martin Cohen is quoted.
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates there were 24,000 injuries on treadmills in 2014,
and 30 reported deaths between 2003 and 2012. Alumna Janessa Graves reports on her research.
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power workers are injured on the job twice as often as the national average for all utilities. Martin Cohen is quoted.
The nation's leading medical practitioners — with the White House behind them — are stepping forward with a diagnosis that all of us should heed, because the symptoms are becoming undeniable and the risks tremendous: Climate change is a health threat
Climate change may worsen the situation for asthma sufferers, whose symptoms can be triggered by air pollution and allergies. Joel Kaufman, who coauthored a new study showing the positive effects of cleaner diesel fuels on buses--is quoted.
Use of clean fuels and updated pollution control measures in the school buses 25 million children ride every day could result in 14 million fewer absences from school a year, based on a study by the University of Michigan and the University of Washington.
Research led by Sara Adar found improved health and less absenteeism, especially among asthmatic children, after Washington switched to cleaner diesel fuel and adopted clean air technologies on school buses.
Debra Cherry leads a team of researchers studying the health habits of commercial fishermen. "They are a rugged, independent people that face a lot of health risks," she says.
Steven Gilbert talks with the host of Toxic Free Talk Radio about pesticides.
Ed Kelly, an adjunct professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, is researching genetic therapy for a rare disease that causes small, fatty deposits to accumulate in the back of the eye.
Studies show that people believe organic foods — just by the nature of being organic — are healthier all around. The problem is: sometimes they're not. Recent UW research led by former PhD student Cynthia Curl is cited.
Dean Howard Frumkin's professional mission is "healthier places for people." He also studies the effect of the natural world on humans – that is, as a strategy to promote health.
Dean Howard Frumkin is critical of the journal Epidemiology's policy to separate policy implications of research from actual research reports.
Gerard Cangelosi is one of many researchers worldwide working on ways to reduce TB's health impacts. His research on an alternative method to diagnose TB is detailed.
A state report is critical of the methods used to evaluate the air quality at John Marshall School in Seattle.  Catherine Karr is quoted on the potential health effects of traffic pollution.
Former college student-athletes who were injured are on their own to pay medical bills when they leave school. Richard Gleason explains who is covered by the workers' compensation system.
Health Impact Assessments are useful tools to promote public health because they raise awareness of health issues among decision-makers, a new study finds. Andrew Dannenberg--one of the authors--is quoted.
Eco-conscious shoppers now have an alternative to organic food that has been certified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as Certified Naturally Grown, a pesticide-free method of farming. Alumna Cynthia Curl is quoted.
A simple mouth swab may one day help diagnose tuberculosis, if the results of a small trial conducted in South Africa and the US can be replicated. Gerard Cangelosi led the research in Seattle.
Steven Gilbert talks with the host of Toxic Free Talk Radio about why people don’t believe there is a problem with toxics when there is so much scientific evidence.
Researchers led by Gerard Cangelosi helped develop a protocol to test for tuberculosis in easy-to-obtain oral swab samples, greatly improving upon existing detection methods.
Overexposure to pesticides caused eight orders for temporary work removal of pesticide handlers in Washington tree fruit orchards under the state's testing program that measures depression of cholinesterase, a blood enzyme needed for healthy nervous systems. Richard Fenske is quoted.
Researchers have shown that reducing air pollution leads to improved respiratory function in children ages 11 to 15, a critical period of lung development. Joel Kaufman is quoted.
Julia Yue Cui is studying why the livers of children and adults often react quite differently to therapeutic drugs, by investigating bacteria that reside in the intestines and compose the gut microbiome.
Among other studies just published in a special journal issue on fracking and health, one led by Peter Rabinowitz and others found that natural gas extraction may impact the health of animals living nearby.
Drawing inspiration from veterinary medicine, researchers at the University of Washington have helped developed a new prospective approach to detect tuberculosis (TB) – easy-to-obtain oral swab samples, greatly improving on standard diagnostics.
Sverre Vedal is the first chairholder of the AXA Research Fund Chair in Air Pollution and Health. He is a guest professor at the Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences in Beijing, China.
Catherine Karr is investigating air pollution in the Yakima Valley and how it may affect
children who suffer from asthma.
The world is quickly approaching a point where the question isn’t whether to respond to climate change—it’s how, writes Kristie Ebi and co-authors in this op-ed.
Steven Gilbert talks about lead and exposures.
New findings from study led by Gary Franklin show strong collaborations and interventions led to a substantial reversal of the epidemic of death and injury in Washington state related to the use of prescription opioids for chronic noncancer pain.
Jon Nagata coordinated workshops with the state to help water-treatment operators and managers implement source water-protection strategies.
A study led by Peter Rabinowitz found that people living near natural gas wells may be at increased risk for adverse health impacts, including skin and respiratory conditions.
Study led by Marilyn Roberts finds more than half of the 33 fire stations taking part in a survey tested positive for MRSA.
Joel Kaufman, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted in a piece about what could become the nation's largest oil-by-rail terminal.
Dean Howard Frumkin co-authors an op/ed piece calling for a clean-fuels standard to help save lives and protect the health of people suffering from asthma and other lung and heart diseases.
In Chair Michael Yost's response to Governor Jay Inslee's climate change proposal, he points to an added benefit of cutting carbon pollution: "cleaner air for our lungs."

Peter Rabinowitz, lead author on one of the health studies cited by the New York State Department of Health, weighs in on the state's ban on fracking.
PhD student Heather Fowler, who is also a trained vet, investigated the risk from Salmonella for people who keep backyard chickens.
About a dozen leading researchers from China and across the United States came to the Fred Hutch campus this week for a two-and-a-half day workshop. Terrance Kavanagh and Edmund Seto are quoted.
Toluwalose Okitika (MPH, 2013) led study of interactive “Polio Eradication Game,” which may increase public interest in global health.
Catherine Karr in the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety & Heath Center leads a five-year project to reduce the exposure of children in agricultural settings to substances that trigger asthma.
Peter Rabinowitz speaks at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies about One Health and the need for collaboration between human health professionals and veterinarians.
PhD student Heather Fowler, a veterinarian, volunteers to treat pets of homeless and low-income people at free Union Gospel Mission clinics. She appeared in a photo story in the Seattle Times.
Howard Frumkin says climate change is "the biggest health challenge in the coming century."
Asthma has long been recognized as a problem among Yakima Valley children. More recently, outdoor air pollution, in particular pollutants from large animal-feeding operations, was linked to asthma in a study led by Catherine Karr.
Sheela Sathyanarayana led research that found a child's diet contains high levels of phthalates, a chemical associated with neuro developmental issues and changes in behavior.
Gary Franklin has led efforts to reduce the use of prescription pain relievers for non-cancer pain.
The University of Washington is examining its readiness plans and advising employees and students on Ebola. Peter Rabinowitz is quoted.
Some states are considering quarantine rules that exceed CDC guidelines in order to respond to concerns of the local communities. Peter Rabinowitz is quoted.
The governor of Washington state readies a measure to limit carbon emissions. Dean Howard Frumkin is quoted.
Chemicals in shampoo, toothpaste and medicines are being detected in surface waters and fish nationwide, and Evan Gallagher and Andrew Yeh, among others, are investigating whether these chemicals are in south Puget Sound and their effects on fish.
Bill Daniell and Tao Sheng Kwan-Gett call for round-table forum to address opportunities in the Duwamish Valley that will promote community and economic health, with benefits for the rest of the city and broader region.
Your dog really could make you sick. Researchers estimate that there are roughly 4 million pet-derived human infections in the U.S. per year, costing the public upwards of $300 million in medical expenses. Peter Rabinowitz is quoted.
The danger of overdoses from prescription pain medication led Gary Franklin to help develop guidelines for prescribers.
Edmund Seto wants to heighten individuals’ awareness of their surrounding micro environments, wherever they go, and in doing so, to learn whether the information spurs healthy changes in behavior.
Powerful painkillers do little to improve patients' daily functioning, finds the American Academy of Neurology in a new position statement authored by Gary Franklin on opioid painkillers for chronic pain not related to cancer.
The animals in our midst are also sentinels of health. Diseases in domestic or wild animals can be signs of trouble in the environment and among humans. The Zoobiquity 2014 conference on Nov 1--organized by the UW Center for One Health Research--will explore the clinically important overlaps between illnesses in people and other living creatures.
Biking, walking and other active forms of transportation are just a few ways that reducing our use of fossil fuels may benefit not only the planet but also our health and the economy, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Monday. Dean Howard Frumkin was a co-author.
Residents living near active natural gas wells in Pennsylvania suffer from more respiratory and skin conditions than people living further away, a new study led by Peter Rabinowitz has found.
Health officials need to be a much bigger part of decisions about how to reduce and deal with the effects of climate change, says Professor Kristie Ebi.
Dean Howard Frumkin comments on the health effects of heat after a report ranks Louisville among the top 10 U.S. cities with a serious urban heat island effect.
The Seattle Times editorial board says David Fleming's successor at Public Health - Seattle & King County should adopt and continue some of the same strategies that made him such an effective leader. Howard Frumkin, dean of the School of Public Health, is quoted.
Researchers across the US and around the world are using nanotech methods to create new and better products, including those that treat disease. Terrance Kavanagh and studies in the UW Nanotoxicology Center on the impacts of nanotechnology on human health are mentioned.
"Superbug" known as CRE has increased in community hospitals and MRSA has been found in fire stations. Study led by Marilyn Roberts is mentioned.
Fighting fires is a dangerous job, and new research on firehouses around Washington state has revealed another hazard — one that lurks on firefighters' boots, their trucks and even their TV remotes. Marilyn Roberts is interviewed on the threat of MRSA.
A new study led by Samantha Serrano and Sheela Sathyanarayana shows that an infant with a typical diet is consuming more phthalates than the Environmental Protection Agency considers safe.
Associate Professor Scott Meschke talks about the health risks connected with eating food touched by rats.
Tesoro refinery fights government accusations that it willfully put its workers in harm's way. Richard Gleason comments on industrial accidents and workplace-safety violations.
A national survey finds doctors reluctant to counseling pregnant patients about environmental health hazards. Sheela Sathyanarayana--who is quoted--published suggestions for doctors on the subject in 2012.
Research suggests Seattle was on the right track when it laid out a network of parks. Now we need to expand public access, writes Dean Howard Frumkin.
Marcie Sillman speaks with William Daniell about Washington's fish consumption rate — a little number that has a big impact.
Federal environmental health experts and a team of pediatricians from the UW will arrive in the Yakima Valley this summer to train local health care providers in recognizing the health hazards associated with nitrate contamination in groundwater. Associate Professor Catherine Karr is quoted.
Various groups, including a department-sponsored public health campaign, have jump-started new projects to tackle sexual harassment and abuse in the agricultural industry. Victoria Breckwich Vásquez is quoted.
Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility endorsed Citizens of Ebey’s Reserve's efforts to close the Coupeville Outlying Field (OLF). DEOHS researchers who studied the health effects of noise on children and presented to community residents is mentioned.
DEOHS researchers contributed to a study that found emissions from airplanes at Los Angeles International Airport increase ultrafine particle number concentrations more than 10 miles east of the airport.
Study on sexual harassment of female farmworkers women leads to education and outreach campaign on prevention. Team from the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center is collaborating with partners in Eastern Washington.
High levels of potentially harmful exhaust particles from jets using Los Angeles International Airport have been detected in a broad swath of densely populated communities up to 10 miles east of the runways, according to a new study involving the UW and scientists from the Department of Occupational and Health Sciences.
Stronger communities could be a silver lining to environmental disasters, notes Dean Howard Frumkin. "We might actually improve mental health" by creating strong community networks and taking up proactive steps like walking and biking more and driving less, he says.
French study finds muncipal wastewater contributes to antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the environment. Scott Meschke says United States has "multi-barrier approach" to treating wastewater and strict standards for bacteria and oxygen.
Three years after the CIA used an immunization survey as a cover in its hunt for Osama bin Laden, the White House has promised that the agency will never again use a vaccination campaign in its operations, an official said Monday. The action came in response to a letter from the deans of 12 U.S. public health schools, including Dean Howard Frumkin of SPH.
Washington state officials are investigating reports of pesticide-related illness. Richard Fenske is quoted.
The School is working with a California community to deploy air-quality monitors. Edmund Seto is quoted.
Researchers are developing tools to assess risks at the tap, measuring water treatment byproducts that may pose risks to health, and providing training to water system managers and operators to better protect water sources. Nicole Van Abel, Gretchen Onstad, and Jonathan Nagata are highlighted.
Thanks to rising carbon dioxide levels, wheat, rice, and soybeans could have lower levels of zinc and iron in the future, according to new research. Dean Howard Frumkin is quoted.
DEOHS's 20 laboratories will assess whether they can make their processes more sustainable without compromising their science.
DEOHS team of researchers discovers how battery recycling in a community can lead to lead exposures, creates awareness of preventive measures.
Thomas Burbacher and others in the Infant Primate Research Laboratory are featured in this PBS series demonstrating how learning differs between humans and monkeys.
Workers who regularly experience noise levels of 100 decibels or more have double the risk of being hospitalized for a job injury, and for those who have hearing loss, the risk is even greater. Peter Rabinowitz is quoted.
Transition to low-carbon lifestyle won't be as painful as we think, but action is needed now, says Dean Howard Frumkin.
Bigger screens are better for faster typing. Article cites research done in Peter Johnson's laboratory on tablets and other mobile devices.
Dean Howard Frumkin is interviewed about a new report from the American Association for the Advancement of Science that says more than 97 percent of climate scientists agree that human-caused climate change is happening.
In a letter to the editor, Dean Howard Frumkin cites the work of UW students in gathering research that led Seattle transportation officials to retime signal lights along busy Rainier Avenue.
Richard Fenske responds to concerns about pesticide applicators who were removed from work due to overexposure to the chemicals and explains the test used in Washington's monitoring program.
A new 15-minute training module for Harborview's healthcare supervisors--a project led by June Spector--is featured.
Kendra Broadwater (BS, Environmental Health, 2011) shares how her environmental health studies and research experience led to a meaningful career in workplace safety and health.
A study led by Peter Johnson found that the Bose seat reduced drivers' exposure to whole body vibration by 50 percent. The long-term health savings to invest in superior equipment may far outweigh the short-term savings.
A state official said he "can guarantee" some West Virginians are breathing in traces of a carcinogen while showering after the chemical spill, but federal health guidelines say people need to breathe "a lot of it" to be a problem. Dean Howard Frumkin, an environmental health specialist, is quoted.
David Eaton, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, explains why he is a proud Tesla car owner in this article about the high-tech, fully electric car.
Safer cell-phone tower climbing regulations are needed, say experts in a story about a Washington worker who fell from a tower due to an improperly installed climbing mount. Richard Gleason is quoted.
Dean Howard Frumkin comments on the healthy building movement -- structures that are not only green but also protect human health by minimizing chemical exposures.
Children in day care facilities may be exposed to roadway traffic pollution. Joel Kaufman and Catherine Karr are quoted.
A new study in Kenya led by Peter Rabinowitz will investigate gut bacteria shared between humans and animals and how these might influence malnutrition.
New findings show early life exposure to diesel exhaust is linked to heart failure in mice. Lead author Chad Weldy (PhD, Tox, 2012) is quoted.
Research by Peter Johnson, Monica Zigman, and Molly Halverson is featured in this multi-media story.
There is now a pile of evidence, sometimes startling, that air pollution also plays a role in heart attacks and strokes. Joel Kaufman is quoted.
Fruit Valley residents say they want the companies planning an oil transfer facility to listen to the community. Joel Kaufman is quoted.
A King 5 news story investigates the health effects of diesel exhaust on children's health, particularly on those children who attend schools next to busy roadways. Catherine Karr is quoted.
A study by department researchers on air pollution in South Seattle is mentioned in this news story on coal trains and pollution.
Peter Rabinowitz is quoted in an article on the founder of the annual Zoobiquity Conference that brings physicians and vets together.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that every year, roughly one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illness. How can you protect yourself? Marcie Sillman talks with Associate Professor Scott Meschke.

New research finds that premium poultry consumers are not getting what they're paying for. Professor Marilyn Roberts is quoted.
A collaborative project with neighborhood residents, looking at diesel air pollution in South Seattle, is profiled in this news report. Julie Fox is interviewed about the UW's role.

Professor Michael Rosenfeld comments on a ballot initiative in Washington state that would require labeling of genetically engineered foods.

A new report from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists cites the dangers of prenatal exposure to certain chemicals. Dean Howard Frumkin is quoted.

Undergraduate Jose Carmona — who interned in the department's Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center — is featured in this news article on the UW's College Assistance Migrant Program.
Proposals introduced in Berkeley, California address the use of dental amalgam--which contains mercury--in teeth fillings. Research by Jim Woods is cited.
The world of design and health care need to converge to create great habitats, according to guest columnists Howard Frumkin, dean of the School of Public Health, and Daniel Friedman, former dean of the College of Built Environments.

A KING-5 TV and InvestigateWest story reveals the public health threats of locating schools too close to high-traffic areas. Reporters cite an email by Catherine Karr as well as UW research on air pollution; a biostatistics graduate student is also quoted.

Marilyn Roberts says that food labels listing the use of antibiotics in raising farm animals and fish would allow consumers to make an informed choice when buying meat and fish products. Individual action, she says, may curb widespread use of antibiotics in animal production and control environmental antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
Dean Howard Frumkin and Affiliate Professor Andrew Dannenberg write that building and design fields are increasingly focused on public health.

Safety concerns have been raised about the class of pesticides blamed for killing over 20 children in India. Lucio Costa is quoted.

Howard Frumkin and Andrew Dannenberg explore a decade of work on how the physical design of our neighborhoods influences our health.
Southern Chinese on average have lived at least five years longer than their northern counterparts because of the health effects of pollution from the widespread use of coal in the north, a new study says. Dean Howard Frumkin is quoted.
Inhaling Auto Emissions Makes Good Cholesterol Go Bad

Inhaling motor vehicle emissions may transform good, protective cholesterol into bad, artery-clogging cholesterol that increases the risk of heart disease and stroke, says a new study led by Michael Rosenfeld.

New Book Shapes Environmental Health through Storytelling
“The Return,” a 32-page comic-book created by the UW Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health (CEEH) and the Northwest Indian College, seeks to help more young people understand environmental health.
Traffic Air Pollution Turns Good Cholesterol Bad
New findings suggest that diesel exhaust can alter the protective nature of certain molecules and set in motion biological mechanisms that lead to cardiovascular disease, explains Michael Rosenfeld, who was co-author of the recently published study.
Susan Searles Nielsen says recent study is the first to investigate dietary nicotine and risk of developing Parkinson's disease.
John Kissel talks about lead contamination in soil in a KIRO-TV investigation of a site outside of Index, Wash., where a shooting range once operated.
William Daniell speaks to KUOW about findings from a new study that assesses the health impacts of the proposed plan to clean up the Duwamish River.
Eating peppers may lower the risk of Parkinson's disease, suggests study led by Susan Searles Nielsen.
In the New York Times' Room for Debate section, Michael Silverstein, clinical professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, proposes ways to strengthen OSHA.
Smog and car exhaust can take a toll on the heart, and the latest research by Sara Adar and Joel Kaufman explores how.
Study led by Sara Adar and Joel Kaufman finds higher concentrations of fine particulate air pollution were linked to a faster thickening of the inner two layers of the common carotid artery.
Breathing particulate-laden air may be hardening your arteries faster than normal, according to research led by the University of Michigan and University of Washington School of Public Health.
Nancy Simcox and the DEOHS Student Advisory Group led efforts to commemorate Worker Memorial Day at the UW.
Gary Franklin says new rules for prescribing pain medication have made a difference: there are fewer deaths among injured workers.
Bill Gates and other leaders push for $5.5 billion to wipe out polio by 2018. Dean Howard Frumkin and Chris Elias are quoted.
Low-dose antibiotics in animal feed constitutes a human health hazard, writes Marilyn Roberts.
Graduate Student Cynthia Curl named SPH Magnuson Scholar for 2013-14.
DEOHS Graduate Student Cynthia Curl was named the 2013-14 SPH Magnuson Scholar for her research on pesticides, diet, and health effects.
Dr. Howard Frumkin Urges Medical, Nursing Students to Consider Human Habitats
During a keynote address at the 10th annual Western Regional International Health Conference in Portland, School of Public Health Dean Howard Frumkin stressed the need to build healthier cities.
Epidemiologist Preetha Rajaraman (MS, Environmental Health, 1997) examines why some people are more susceptible to brain cancer than others.
Some residents of the Duwamish Valley in south Seattle have more health problems than residents elsewhere in the city, an EPA-funded study finds. Bill Daniell is quoted.
The Environmental Protection Agency has released a plan to clean up the polluted Duwamish River in south Seattle. The School of Public Health is working with local residents on a Health Impact Assessment of the cleanup plan.
UW research group reduces lead exposure at gun ranges
The Field Research and Consultation Group examines the health hazards posed by lead in the smoke of fired bullets
New study led by Sheela Sathyanarayana: Contaminated diet contributes to phthalate and bisphenol A exposure.
High fat dairy, spices found to contain high levels of chemical used in plastic. Study by Sheela Sathyanarayana.
A study in Nature Climate Change says that global warming will noticeably reduce the amount of time people can spend working and playing safely outside. Dean Howard Frumkin is interviewed.
Richard Gleason is quoted on safety measures for workers in Seattle Times story on employees suing gun range over lead exposure.
Sheela Sathyanarayana discusses how low level pollution might negatively impact unborn children.
More than 250 people gathered at Town Hall Seattle to hear panelists from the School of Public Health and King County bring a public-health perspective to to the issue of gun violence.
Pesticide Exposure & Your Child
Associate Professor Catherine Karr talks about children and pesticide exposure on RadioMD.
UW Graduate School welcomes new dean: David Eaton.
David L. Eaton, associate vice provost for research and professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, has been selected as dean of the Graduate School, effective March 15.
We need to anticipate the effects of climate change, and prepare for them, to protect the public, writes Dean Howard Frumkin.
Findings from MPH student Jill Schulte's study with King County shows traffic disproportionately affects the poor and people of color.
Increasing evidence shows urban and rural children are regularly exposed to low levels of pesticides that can have serious long-term health effects, according to a policy statement by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Catherine Karr is a co-author.

Dean Howard Frumkin talks with UW 360 about what makes places healthy.

Accidental overdoses are now a leading cause of accidental deaths in the US, surpassing car crashes. Research Professor Gary Franklin is quoted.

Exposure to low levels of air pollution in the Puget Sound area has modest effects on fetal growth, with important public health implications, says a study led by Sheela Sathyanarayana.
The American Public Health Association urged Congress to modernize the nation's Clean Water Act to protect coastal water quality. The resolution was written by six University of Washington public health graduate students.
Chronic exposure to air pollution linked to atherosclerosis in published study. Research Scientist Ranjini Krishnan, lead author of the article, is cited.
Study led by Kay Teschke (PhD, Industrial Hygiene and Safety, 1994) finds cyclists far safer if they ride on a physically separated bike lane than alongside cars on busy city streets.
Yolanda Sanchez (MS/MPA, Environmental Health/Public Affairs, 2007) is profiled in UW Viewpoint.
Peter Johnson and his colleagues are testing computer devices and desks to see what designs keep workers healthier and more productive.
Joel Kaufman recommends that people who live in the Wenatchee Valley should take precautions to limit exposure to smoke from the forest fires, but not to be worry about long-term health effects.
Smoke from the Idaho wildfire posed a health risk to a small mountain town that was the staging area for firefighters battling the blaze, health officials said. Joel Kaufman comments.
Scientific evidence on climate change's impact to human health bolsters Clark County Public Health's community planning initiatives.
Sheela Sathyanarayana addresses questions about exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates.
Seattle researchers are engineering a kidney tissue chip to predict drug safety. David Eaton is part of the research team.
People who fish from the polluted Duwamish River may already experience health disparities, says William Daniell .
Washington state casts line for residents' fish-consumption rate
Because fish can harbor toxic chemicals, the state of Washington wants to know how much fish people eat. Affiliate Professor Patricia Cirone is quoted.
Environmental health pediatrician Sheela Sathyanarayana says preventing an infant's exposure to BPA is key.
Wildfires offer a preview of the disasters climate change could bring. Dean Howard Frumkin explains the public health impacts, from intense air pollution to post-traumatic stress disorder.
Thomas Burbacher--who studies the impact of environmental chemicals on a child's development--has a personal story that ties into the need for research with nonhuman primates.
MPH student Tolu Okitika wrote an opinion piece for The Guardian on environmental health issues in Nigeria.
Shoes contaminated with lead pose risk to children, says Steven Gilbert.
A diagnostic laboratory test could identify young children at risk of developing autism. James Woods talks with Crosscut about this research.
UW event organized by Nancy Simcox honors 19 King County workers who died last year as a result of workplace injuries. Howard Frumkin led the memorial.
Study will identify potential impacts to community from Duwamish River cleanup, explains William Daniell.
James Woods talks with KUOW about a potential biomarker for autism.
Will Bond (BS, 2012) shares his job success, stemming from his Environmental Health internship at Amazon, with the UW’s The Daily.
Older women living in places with high levels of fine-particle pollution had a much greater risk of first-time stroke, according to a California study. Joel Kaufmann says air pollution is also linked to heart attacks.
Gary Franklin's research on doctor-prescribed painkillers and overdoses cited in article about Washington state's new law limiting opioid prescriptions.
Starting April 4, UWTV is airing a segment about DEEDS and MESA air pollution research, featuring Joel Kaufman (DEOHS, Epi) and Julie Fox (DEOHS). The show, UW360, is on the website and airs weekly on Wednesdays at 10 pm and Sundays at 9 pm. It will also air on KOMO-TV Sat., April 28, at 4:30 pm.
Sheela Sathyanarayana talks to King 5 about how mothers can reduce exposure to environmental chemicals.
Findings from studies led by Joel Kaufman can help us understand the health effects from diesel exhaust exposure, such as from the increased coal train traffic in the Pacific Northwest.
The Field Research & Consultation Group recently released a new booklet for firefighters: "Prevent MRSA."
John Kissel says that there is not enough testing of waste water treatment facilities to know how much of the chemicals found in drugs and personal care products remain in the water and their effects on human and environmental health.
US environment agency misses dioxin deadline
The federal agency missed a self-imposed deadline to release recommendations for regulation of dioxins. David Eaton (DEOHS), chairman of a National Academies of Sciences’ committee evaluating health risks from dioxin, is quoted.
Marilyn Roberts recommends that people take precautions against exposure to MRSA.
How to build a healthy transportation system
Economic and environmental impacts shouldn’t be the only factors when creating transportation policy. Planners should also consider people’s health and well-being, says Dean Howard Frumkin in a personal guest column.
PhD Candidate Vanessa Galaviz (DEOHS) just received the Martin Luther King Jr. Community Volunteer Award.
Mount Adams' glaciers have shrunk by nearly half since 1904. Richard Fenske (DEOHS) and Richard Hoskins (Epi) have been involved with the Climate Impacts Group quoted in the article.
Michael Yost says that biofuel use has advantages, but cautions that biofuel emissions contribute to air pollution in Northwest.
New metrics are needed for fish consumption in Washington state to protect public health. Professor Elaine Faustman (DEOHS) and Frank James (HServ), Health Officer for San Juan County Health Department, are interviewed.
PhD student Eyob Mazengia, who is a restaurant inspector for the Seattle and King County Public Health department, is profiled in Seattle Met.
Sverre Vedal gives the Fall 2011 Distinguished Faculty Lecture, featured in a School of Public Health Q&A
Undergraduate Anna Fretheim is an "extraordinary student"
Jeffrey Walls (MS student, Exposure Sciences) was awarded the 2011 Future Leader in EHS scholarship.
Investing in occupational health "best practices" improves outcomes for injured workers, study finds. Gary Franklin led the creation of the Centers of Occupational Health and Education.
Hilary Zetlen received a Bonderman Travel Fellowship. Check out what she is doing with it on her blog.
Hilary Zetlen (MPH, Environmental & Occupational Health, 2011), who received a Bonderman Travel Fellowship, is blogging about her year of travel overseas.
PhD student Chad Weldy, an environmental toxicologist, discusses the health effects of diesel exhaust on KGMI in Bellingham.
Alumna Meagan Yoshimoto-Clark, an industrial hygienist, is featured on Careers Out There.
Tainted food is everywhere, and if you think you're being thoroughly protected, think again. Epi's John Kobayashi and DEOHS lecturer Charles Easterberg are mentioned.
Marilyn Roberts and Nancy Simcox are sending environmental sampling kits to Washington state fire station personnel to determine how widespread MRSA bacteria really is.
Washington Fire Chiefs Partner With UW To Protect Firefighters From MRSA
Environmental toxicologist David Eaton elected to Institute of Medicine.
Team of researchers receive NORA Innovative Research Award for preventing construction workers’ hearing loss.
Team of researchers receive NORA Innovative Research Award for preventing construction workers’ hearing loss.
Clement Furlong's research may identify individuals exposed to jet engine oil, help oil manufacturers develop less-toxic lubricants.
DEOHS and Global Health professor Marilyn Roberts has found more MRSA--this time on some UW dental students and in their clinics.
2011 DEOHS Award Winners
Terrance Kavanagh and David Eaton featured in article on the July Nanotechnology Consortium held at the University of Washington
Health Impacts Of Climate Change
Richard Fenske and Michael Yost talk about health impacts of climate change in our region.
Study: BPA found on register receipts, dollar bills
Sheela Sathyanarayana says BPA found on receipts a new concern; recommends limiting exposure to BPA used to preserve shelf life of canned foods by eating fresh food or buying BPA-free canned goods.
David Eaton Named to WA Academy of Sciences
David Eaton named to WA Academy of Science
Environmental exposure expert Sally Liu passed away on June 6
Environmental exposure expert Sally Liu passed away on June 6
Breathing Uneasy: The Air Pollution Crisis in South Seattle
Behind-the-Scenes at the Controlled Exposure Lab
Evan Gallagher examines the role of Omega-3 fatty acids in protecting our cells against potentially damaging chemicals
A new study puts the Puget Sound in the top 5% of communities nationally for air toxics: South Seattle is the worst. Joel Kaufman and Michael Yost are quoted.
Study led by Marilyn Roberts finds MRSA in fire stations
Study led by Marilyn Roberts finds MRSA in fire stations
Matthew Keifer to serve on Institute of Medicine panel
Protecting kids from chemicals in the environment
Sheela Sathyanarayana advises parents to reduce their children's exposure to pollutants.
Student Research Day 2011
Student Research Day 2011
Pacific Northwest Center for Human Health and Ocean Studies is co-organizing the Algae and Human Health Symposium, July 15
Pacific Northwest Center for Human Health and Ocean Studies is co-organizing the Algae and Human Health Symposium, July 15
Sheela Sathyanarayana leads study, investigates relationship between mother's BPA exposures during pregnancy and infant's neurobehavioral abnormalities
Sheela Sathyanarayana leads study, investigates relationship between mother's BPA exposures during pregnancy and infant's neurobehavioral abnormalities
First-ever legislation to protect health-care workers who administer chemotherapy drugs. Michael Silverstein quoted.
First-ever legislation to protect health-care workers who administer chemotherapy drugs. Michael Silverstein quoted.
Antibiotics for livestock may be adding to problem of drug-resistant bacteria, says Charles Easterberg
Antibiotics for livestock may be adding to problem of drug-resistant bacteria, says Charles Easterberg.
Sauk-Suiattle tribal offices in Darrington closed for clean-up after MRSA report
Sauk-Suiattle tribal offices will be closed for a week after reports that an employee may have MRSA. Marilyn Roberts' research is referenced.
Symposium on workplace disasters marks 100th anniversary of Triangle Shirtwaist Fire
Symposium on workplace disasters marks 100th anniversary of Triangle Shirtwaist Fire
Experts Say Radiation From Japan Too Low To Worry About
Michael Yost says data from monitors in Washington state show radiation levels are normal.
Should Duwamish cleanup also focus on improving the health of those nearby?
Ultra-fine particles thrown off by diesel trucks can concentrate in "hot spots" and worsen air quality, says Joel Kaufman.
The high health costs of a Seattle's Superfund site: it can take years off your life
Catherine Karr says children who are iron-deficient absorb lead more readily.
Study: Wood Smoke a Leading Health Concern in Tacoma
Wood Smoke a Leading Health Concern in Tacoma, says study by the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency and the University of Washington.
UW Nanotoxicology Center to look at nanoscale product safety
UW Nanotoxicology Center to look at nanoscale product safety
As Ozone Decision Looms, EPA Finds Stronger Science
Recent studies suggest that smog-filled air kills more people and causes more breathing problems than previously thought. Lianne Sheppard is quoted.
UW named base for EPA-funded Clean Air Research Center
UW named base for EPA-funded Clean Air Research Center
Stopping Washington state coal production is a no-brainer
Howard Frumkin: Phasing out coal use is smart health policy.
Children in Coal-Heated Houses are Shorter
Catherine Karr: homes need clean fuel for heating and cooking.
Richard Neitzel studies transit, other noises in life
Richard Neitzel studies transit, other noises in life
Reducing the Risk of Higher Rates of Breast Cancer in Seattle
Sheela Sathyanarayana recommends eco-friendly products to decrease risk of baby developing cancer later in life
Reducing the Risk: the environment and cancer
An interview with Anneclaire De Roos on minimizing exposure to chemicals.
Keeping older folks healthy can pay off
Howard Frumkin spoke on the built environment and health in Clark County.
Andy Dannenberg retires from CDC, continues work in improving the built environment
Andy Dannenberg retires from CDC, continues work in improving the built environment
Endowment for UW Libraries in honor of Stanley Pier
Endowment for UW Libraries in honor of Stanley Pier
Environmental Health Research Experience Program, Deadline Feb. 15
Environmental Health Research Experience Program, Deadline Feb. 15
Howard Frumkin says the U.S. needs to be better prepared to deal with climate-related disease
Howard Frumkin says the U.S. needs to be better prepared to deal with climate-related disease
Richard Fenske leads initiative on climate change and global health
Richard Fenske leads initiative on climate change and global health
UW Researcher Wins 2010 Ergonomics Professional of the Year Award
UW Researcher Wins 2010 Ergonomics Professional of the Year Award
Professor Marilyn Roberts talks to King 5 about firefighters and MRSA exposure
Professor Marilyn Roberts talks to King 5 about firefighters and MRSA exposure
Protecting us from the dangers of coal ash
Protecting us from the dangers of coal ash
Master's degree student Katie McDonald featured
Master's degree student Katie McDonald featured
PNASH program is improving the health and safety of the agricultural community in Washington’s Yakima Valley (p. 7)
PNASH program is improving the health and safety of the agricultural community in Washington's Yakima Valley (p. 7)
Professor Marilyn Roberts says germs on cell phones aren't the problem, but germs on hands can be.
Professor Marilyn Roberts says it's not the phone, but your hands you should worry about.
Environmental health and safety specialist, one of the "best jobs in America"
Environmental health and safety specialist, one of the "best jobs in America"
New SPH Dean Howard Frumkin speaks on opportunities in health and the built environment on October 14th
New SPH Dean Howard Frumkin speaks on opportunities in health and the built environment on October 14th
Research Professor Gary Franklin  says overdoses on prescription medication a public health problem
Research Professor Gary Franklin says overdoses on prescription medication a public health problem
Professor Matthew Keifer to head National Farm Medicine’s new Dairy Workers Institute
Professor Matthew Keifer to head National Farm Medicine's new Dairy Workers Institute
Professor Marilyn Roberts' study of MRSA contamination leads to recommendations for firefighter, EMT safety and health
Professor Marilyn Roberts' study of MRSA contamination leads to recommendations for firefighter, EMT safety and health
Senior Lecturer Janice Camp quoted in story on worker safeguards in the U.S.

Senior Lecturer Janice Camp quoted in story on worker safeguards in the U.S.

Howard Frumkin named new Dean of Public Health
Howard Frumkin named new Dean of Public Health
Adjunct Professor Scott Barnhart does not expect effects of the Gulf spill on humans to be permanent.
Adjunct Professor Scott Barnhart does not expect effects of the Gulf spill on humans to be permanent.
Clinical Professor Phillip Landrigan spotlighted in CNN special report on environmental exposures

Clinical Professor Phillip Landrigan spotlighted in CNN special report on environmental exposures

Endowed lectureship named in honor of tireless public health advocate, Peter Breysse
Endowed lectureship named in honor of tireless public health advocate, Peter Breysse
New Study Links ADHD to Pesticide Exposure. Dr. Catherine Karr talks about the science behind the studies and how the pesticides affect children's brains.
New Study Links ADHD to Pesticide Exposure. Dr. Catherine Karr talks about the science behind the studies and how the pesticides affect children's brains.
Student Research Day 2010
Student Research Day 2010
Environmental and Occupational Health: From Local to Global
Environmental and Occupational Health: From Local to Global
Evidence builds for air pollution's link to heart disease, death
Evidence builds for air pollution's link to heart disease, death
A new study involving researchers from the University of Washington is changing the way doctors advise heart patients.
A new study involving researchers from the University of Washington is changing the way doctors advise heart patients.
Where the environment and children's health come together at the UW
Where the environment and children's health come together at the UW
Pollution levels still concern for marine life in Tacoma's Commencement Bay, says Department of Ecology's Rob Duff (MS, Toxicology, 1993).
Pollution levels still concern for marine life in Tacoma's Commencement Bay, says Department of Ecology's Rob Duff (MS, Toxicology, 1993).
Sheela Sathyanarayana, a physician in the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty unit, applauds South Seattle school closure, says the decision protects children's health
Sheela Sathyanarayana, a physician in the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty unit, applauds South Seattle school closure, says the decision protects children's health
WSU Educator Wins First UW-PNASH Outstanding Research Partnership Award
WSU Educator Wins First UW-PNASH Outstanding Research Partnership Award
Catherine Karr, director of the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, quoted in KING 5 News story on lead exposure and ADHD in children.
Catherine Karr, director of the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, quoted in KING 5 News story on lead exposure and ADHD in children.
Our Field Research and Consultation Group produced an educational video training package for welders to raise awareness of potential exposures to chrome 6.
Our Field Research and Consultation Group produced an educational video training package for welders to raise awareness of potential exposures to chrome 6.
Clinical Professor Philip Landrigan is quoted in a NY Times article about the National Children's Study.
Clinical Professor Philip Landrigan is quoted in a NY Times article about the National Children's Study.
Seattle BioMed, AttoDx, Inc., and the University of Washington Announce Exclusive Technology License Agreement
Seattle BioMed, AttoDx, Inc., and the University of Washington Announce Exclusive Technology License Agreement
Scientists from the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, the University of Washington Climate Impacts Group, and Northwest Center for Public Health Practice addressed a need for local data on climate change and its health impacts.
Pesticides in your peaches
Pesticides in your peaches: Chicago Tribune and USDA studies find pesticides, some in excess of EPA rules, in the fragrant fruit. Adjunct Assistant Professor Catherine Karr, who serves on the American Academy of Pediatrics National Committee on Environmental Health, and former postdoc Alex Lu, who now teaches at Harvard, quoted on children's exposure to pesticides.
Dr. Lianne Sheppard delivered the School's Fall Quarter Distinguished Faculty Lecture entitled "Health Effects of Environmental Exposures: When Do We See Them and Why Do We Miss Them?" Dr. Sheppard is Professor of Biostatistics and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences in the School. View slides.

Student Profiles

Kate Tokareva

Kate came to public health in a roundabout way. Her mom works at Swedish Medical Center as a sonographer, so she was exposed to hospitals at a young age. Kate enjoyed listening to stories about patient interactions and always looked forward to tagging along with her Mom. Kate was on the pre-med path when she got to college, which was a good fit, but found that the introductory science classes were notoriously big and competitive.

Deanna Ly
Junior, Environmental Health
Hometown: Seattle, WA
Esther Min

PhD student, Environmental and Occupational Hygiene
Hometown: Daejeon, South Korea

Close Up July 2017: Heather Fowler

After four years studying dairy practices in Washington state, Heather Fowler is turning her attention to the pork industry. This year's PhD Omenn Award Winner (the School's highest academic honor) is excited to put her degrees to work to improve food safety, protect people who produce pork, and prevent the spread of diseases from hogs to humans.

Ryan Kouchakji - Undergrad

Senior, Environmental Health. Why study Environmental Health? To learn more about topics that directly impact human lives. Environmental health courses teach about the direct interaction between humans and the water we drink, air we breathe, and food we eat.
 

Superbug Sleuth: Karen Michael tracks down routes of exposure to control infection
There are certain microscopic bacteria that make news headlines. It is their threat to public health that propels Karen Michael, who has spent her academic career studying these bacteria and ways people can get exposed.
Maxwell Schrempp Undergrad Student Profile

Senior, Environmental Health
Hometown: Kirkland, WA

The field directly impacts all of our lives, whether we realize it or not. It’s tied to everything from the water we drink, to the roads we drive on. I was drawn to the field because there are plenty of opportunities for one person to have a positive impact on the lives of others.

MPH student works with Northwest Tribal Emergency Management Council to develop Medical Reserve Corps Toolkit
For Jane Vaccaro, whose initial practicum under the Colville Tribe fell through, the wildfires underscored the impact that a disaster can have on Northwest Tribal communities. She was hosted instead by the Northwest Tribal Emergency Management Council to help develop a Medical Reserve Corps toolkit.
Vy Tran Undergrad Student Profile

Senior, Environmental Health
Hometown: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The occupational health management and industrial hygiene side of environmental health – I want to make the regulatory and managerial side supportive of safe work procedures. Right now, I work as a research intern with Trevor Peckham and Dr. Noah Seixas of the DEOHS, researching how work and non-work exposures contribute to stress in low-wage workers in Seattle.

Heather Fowler Grad Student Profile

PhD student, Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences

“Emerging environmental health issues are often multi-factorial and really complex and there is no one easy solution,” says Fowler, a PhD student in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences. After veterinary school, Heather Fowler came to the UW School of Public Health to study the occupational health of animal workers.

Sara Mar - Undergrad

Senior, Environmental Health
Hometown: Shoreline, WA

I have always been interested in disease transmission, and was intrigued by how Environmental Health approached this topic from a prevention, rather than treatment, perspective. The major opened my eyes to how the environment plays such a huge role in human health.

Faculty Profiles

Getting people to work together can be a challenge, "but that is where all the interesting science happens," says Michael Yost, chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences. He's working on building the department's interdisciplinary culture while partnering with businesses to improve sustainability. Next on his list? Focusing on the human microbiome as a theme for cross-cutting research.

Close Up December 2016: Joel Kaufman
Joel Kaufman is known as a scientist, physician and research mentor. He studies the links between air pollution and cardiovascular disease while wearing the many hats of mentor, physician, family man, and now interim dean. Find out more about his personal side as well as his vision for the School.
Now Retired, Charles Treser Still Teaches Healthy Homes is of Paramount Importance
Charles Treser retired this summer from the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, where he has been on faculty for the past 36 years. Now, principal lecturer emeritus, he continues to teach, particuarly a subject he holds dear: Housing and Health (Environmental Health 443).
A Career Spent Building Bridges; Janice Camp Retires
After 35 years with the department, Principal Lecturer Janice Camp has retired. She began her career as a graduate student, working in and then directed the Field Research and Consultation (Field Group) group for years before heading the Continuing Education Programs. In these roles, Camp connected our department to workers, employers, health and safety professionals, and others in the professional practice community.
Faculty profile: Kristie Ebi
Kristie Ebi was one of the first experts in the US on global climate change and health. Today she works with developing countries to lessen the impact of climate change on their populations.

Alumni Profiles

Kazu Okumura, BS Environmental Health '08
2008 DEOHS Alumni Kazu Okumura provides analysis and guidance to the FSA on various food, dietary supplements, and cosmetics policies.
2017 Alumni Sara Mar

Sara Mar graduated with a B.S. in Environmental Health in 2017 and now works as a CDC’s Public Health Associate Program (PHAP) Fellow.

Vy Tran
Vy Tran, '16, was driven to study environmental health after seeing how work in a tofu factory took a toll on her mother's mental and physical health. Today she's making an impact as an occupational health worker.
Joseph Coble, MSPH, 1984
Joseph Coble says his advice for current students is to challenge the status quo, to not accept someone’s judgment that reducing exposures and improving working conditions are not feasible. OSHA’s four-decade silica process reflects the need to be persistent and not give up.
Barbara Morrissey, MS, 1991
Barbara Fitzgerald Morrissey’s first job after graduate school took her to Olympia to investigate pesticide-related
illnesses for the Washington State Department of Health.  Two decades later, she is still there, helping translate
science into policy.
Chensheng (Alex) Lu, PhD, 1996
Chensheng (Alex) Lu has studied the effects of pesticides on humans, which began in our Pacific Northwest
Agricultural Safety and Health Center. He recently expanded his research to honeybees.
Toxicology Grad's Role in the Chemical Safety Act
Nancy Beck never imagined she would influence policies being made on Capitol Hill when she was a student in the department. A key part of Beck’s current role at the American Chemistry Council (ACC) is to actively engage with agencies on proposed policies, procedures, and guidance related to chemical risk assessment. She will focus in the coming year on the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act for the 21st Century, signed into law by President Obama in June.
Jane Vaccaro
MPH '16, Occupational and Environmental Health Nursing
Vivian Yu
Vivian Yu graduated from the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health's undergraduate program in 2011. She is now an M.D. Candidate at Georgetown University School of Medicine where she's expected to graduate in 2017. After graduation, Yu worked for the University of Washington's Gynecological Tissue Bank, then moved to Washington D.C. to serve as a member of Americorp, before attending medical school at Georgetown University School of Medicine.
Kelsi Couvrette
Kelsi Couvrette graduated from the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health's undergraduate program in 2010. She now works for Starbuck as a Global Retail Quality Specialist. She loves being able to talk about food safety with a variety of teams.
Photo of Robert Duff, credit: Anne Broache.
Robert Duff knows that certain environmental health issues can be contentious, especially with so many different stakeholders involved. He is currently a senior policy advisor to Governor Jay Inslee on natural resource and environmental issues.
Dalila Zelkanovic
Dalila Zelkanovic graduated from the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health's undergraduate program in 2014. She now works for the Clark County Health Department as an Environmental Health Specialist. Zelkanovic loves the the satisfaction of serving the public, and being on the frontlines of her evolving and developing community.
Wafa Tafesh Taco

Wafa Tafesh Taco graduated from the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health's undergraduate program in 2014. She now works for the Washington State Department of Health Office of Drinking Water as a Public Health Advisor. Tafesh Taco loves that she gets the opportunity to work with many parts of the DOH's drinking water division. She gets to support the disinfection and coliform programs as well as get out in the field to see a water system in action.

Xiaoqiong "Christy" Huang
Xiaoqiong "Christy" Huang graduated from the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health's undergraduate program in 2012. She now works as a Health and Enivronmental Investigator for Seattle and King County Public Health. Huang loves the opportunity to educate food workers, restaurant operators and the general public about the significance of food safety, thereby protecting people from foodborne illnesses.
Will Bond: Protecting Amazon Workers
Will Bond is passionate about protecting employees at one of the nation's largest on-line retailers from work-related musculoskeletal disorders.
Boeing is part of the family for Brie Paske
Worker safety resonates for Breyan (Brie) Paske, in part because members of her family are employed in the manufacturing industry. Paske is a safety administrator with The Boeing Company in Everett.

Staff Profiles

Computing Support Director and Guru, Jim Hogan, Retires After 15-year Tenure
Prior to his retirement from the UW Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS) on May 31st, Jim Hogan had been at the helm of DEOHS’s Computing Support team for 15 years. His impact on the department, personnel, and infrastructure, will continue to make their mark for years to come.
Graduate Student Advocate Rory Murphy Retires After 17-Year Tenure
Graduate students recognized Rory Murphy at the Graduation Recognition Ceremony for her 17-year service as the department’s graduate program advisor. Murphy retires in August 2016.  Chair Michael Yost called her impact and influence “remarkable.”
Photo of Victoria Breckwich Vásquez
Victoria Breckwich Vásquez's lifelong endeavor has been to understand the challenges faced by her mother, a single mom from Peru who became a nurse in Los Angeles. Today, Vásquez channels her passions into improving the health of Latino communities, including a little-studied group of forestry workers in southern Oregon who are vulnerable to on-the-job injuries.