Steering Committee Members (in alphabetical order)

Gerard A. Cangelosi, PhD, Professor, DEOHS, UW

Working in both the public and private sectors, Jerry Cangelosi's research teams have generated 10 patents and over 80 publications in relevant areas including tuberculosis and related diseases, COVID-19, oral microbiology, water-borne pathogens, and healthcare-associated infections. These activities share strong emphases on translation and global health impact. In recent years he has led or co-led infectious disease studies in the United States, Bangladesh, South Africa, Uganda, and Kenya. Among the outputs are novel, non-invasive tuberculosis screening methods that are now in expanded clinical studies worldwide. In the Spring of 2020, amidst the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, his team helped demonstrate similarly non-invasive methods for COVID-19 screening. These methods received accelerated FDA clearance and have become widely implemented in the United States and throughout the world. Non-invasive screening for TB and COVID-19 could help to significantly reduce the global burdens of both diseases.

Email: gcang@uw.edu

Website: https://deohs.washington.edu/cangelosilab

 

Julia Yue Cui, PhD, DABT, Associate Professor, DEOHS, UW

Dr. Cui is trained as a toxicologist, specializing in using toxicogenomic and toxico-epigenomic approaches to determine the effects of environmental chemical exposure and reprogramming the gut microbiome on the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of genes involved in drug metabolism and metabolic syndrome during development.

Email: juliacui@uw.edu

Website: https://deohs.washington.edu/faculty/julia-yue-cui

 

Karen Levy, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor, DEOHS, UW

Dr. Levy's research program focuses on the ecology and epidemiology of enteric (food and waterborne) diseases. Her group examines environmental determinants of the gut microbiome and how interactions between the gut microbiome and enteric pathogens shape acute and chronic child health outcomes. She currently co-directs two projects focused on the infant gut microbiome, enteric pathogens and child health outcomes, one in Ecuador and the other in Mozambique. Both are funded by major grants from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Email: klevyx@uw.edu

Website: https://www.klevyresearch.org

 

Sean Gibbons, PhD, Assistant Professor, Institute for Systems Biology

Dr. Sean Gibbons is an Assistant Professor and the Washington Research Foundation Distinguished Investigator at the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB). He is Affiliate Faculty in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington and a Data Science Fellow at the eScience Institute. Sean has expertise in molecular biology, genomics, microbial ecology, systems biology, and bioinformatics. His lab at ISB explores the interactions between microbial ecology, evolution, and ecosystem function in the mammalian gut, applying these insights to develop precision interventions for improving human health and wellness.

Email: sgibbons@isbscience.org

Website: https://gibbons.isbscience.org/

 

Amy Willis, PhD, Assistant Professor, Biostatistics, UW

Dr. Amy Willis is the Principal Investigator of the Statistical Diversity Lab and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Washington. Amy brings her expertise in statistical methods development, high dimensional data, statistical machine learning, phylogenetics and computational biology to develop tools for the analysis of microbiome and biodiversity data. Amy is passionate about reproducible science, meaningful data analysis, ecosystem and host health, and collaborating with scientists who share these values. 

Email: adwillis@uw.edu

Website: http://statisticaldiversitylab.com/