Who we are

 

 

Jerry Cangelosi

Lab Director
Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
Adjunct Professor, Departments of Global Health and Epidemiology
gcang@uw.edu

Jerry Cangelosi is a Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, and Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health. His research activities in the academic, for-profit, and not-for-profit sectors have generated 10 patents and over 75 publications on tuberculosis and related diseases, food- and water-borne pathogens, respiratory diseases including COVID-19, and healthcare-associated infections. These activities share a strong emphasis on translation and global health impact.
 

DEOHS Bio | Global Health Bio | Epidemiology Bio

 

 

 

 

Kris Weigel

Research Scientist/Engineer 3
kris11@uw.edu

Kris Weigel is the lead Research Scientist and Lab Manager in both the Cangelosi and Cui labs. In the Cangelosi lab, he is working to develop and improve methods for 1) the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and SARS-CoV-2 using oral swabs and 2) pre-rRNA based assays, including molecular viability testing (MVT), to characterize the physiological status and viability of bacterial pathogens. I’ve been in Jerry’s lab professionally for 14 years, or 17 years including my time as an undergraduate intern.

 

 

 

 

Rachel Wood

Research Scientist
woodr8@uw.edu

I am a Research Scientist in the Cangelosi lab and I focus primarily on oral swab analysis. I started working on this project as my Master's thesis in DEOHS at the UW.

 

 

 

 

Renée Codsi

Graduate Research Assistant
codsi@uw.edu

Ms. Codsi is a research assistant with the University of Washington, Cangelosi research team, the Center for One Health Research and the Collaborative on Extreme Event Resilience. Her research background is in vector borne diseases. Ms. Codsi is the lead on the field studies in South Africa and Uganda investigating user acceptance for the OSA sampling method. She creates education tools related to training programs focused on infectious diseases. She investigates and creates programs to prevent occupational exposure of pathogens for health care workers and communities of high risk. Renée is working with development, implementation and evaluation of technologies for TB and Covid-19 respiratory disease diagnostics. She is a cultural translator and science communication specialist.

 

 

 

 

Alaina M. Olson

Research Scientist Assistant
alainamolson@gmail.com

Alaina entered the lab as an undergraduate studying biology in 2016, joining staff in 2017. Her curiosity of infectious disease has grown with each progression in her involvement and investment in the Cangelosi mission. She enjoys her days: in the wet lab jumping between projects, executing experiments, often processing clinical research samples; in the office analyzing data, and preparing manuscripts; and, participating in out of state (and recently, international) conferences! Alaina looks forward to continuing her priceless training under Kris and Rachel, with mentorship and support from Jerry.

 

 

 

 

Grant Whitman

Graduate Research Assistant
whitman5@uw.edu

Grant Whitman is a Master of Public Health student in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences. As a Research Assistant in the Cangelosi Lab, Grant is working to develop methods for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using oral swabs with automated PCR systems.

 

 

 

 

Ethan Valinetz

Clinical Infectious Diseases Fellow
valinetz@uw.edu

I am a clinical infectious diseases fellow and a graduate student in the University of Washington MPH program with a focus in epidemiology. I will be studying the feasibility and acceptability of self-collected oral swabs for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients from the Seattle & King County tuberculosis clinic.

 

 

 

 

Divya Naidoo

Undergraduate Researcher
divya.naidoo5@gmail.com

Divya Naidoo is getting her BS in Public Health and has been an undergraduate researcher in the Cangelosi lab since 2017. Her research compares the spatial and temporal distributions of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in the mouth of TB patients to the distributions of total bacterial DNA.

 

 

 

 

Claire Yang

Undergraduate Researcher
clairely@uw.edu

I'm an undergraduate researcher who is currently learning about the lab's major projects, applying and learning various lab techniques and protocols, and working on my own project that advances the lab's larger projects.

Lauren Sarkissian profile photo

 

 

Lauren Sarkissian

Graduate Research Assistant
lsark@uw.edu

Lauren is an MPH One Health student within the Department of Environmental Occupational Health Sciences. Her background is in molecular genetics and global health research. She is interested in emerging zoonotic disease and improved diagnostics. She is completing her thesis on high-throughput TB detection, working with collaborators in South Africa and Mozambique