David S. Boyle, PhD

Affiliate Associate Professor, Env. and Occ. Health Sciences (Primary department)
I am currently a senior program officer at the Program for Appropriate Technology (PATH) and I am part of the Diagnostics Group within the Technology Solutions Global Program. I lead the Tuberculosis Diagnostics Portfolio in addition to leading key (principle or co-investigator) efforts into developing diagnostic tools for infant HIV, polio virus, integrated nucleic acid diagnostic systems for TB and Clostridium difficile, and multiplexed immunoassays for micronutrient deficiency assessment. In terms of technology development, I am primarily interested in the field of isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies and their application in simple to use yet high performing diagnostic assays for use in low resource settings in the developing world. I lead a variety of projects that investigate isothermal amplification, novel enzymes for nucleic acid amplification, novel nucleic acid extraction/preparation technology and and their co-integration into low cost diagnostic tests.

Contact Information

Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH)
Seattle, WA 98121-
Tel: 206-302-4748
Fax: 206-285-6619

Research Interests

  • Rapid molecular diagnostic tools for use at the point of care
    Tuberculosis
    HIV
    Polio
    Infection during pregnancy and in the neonate
    Population screening for micronutrient deficiencies

Education

PhD, Molecular Biology, University of Edinburgh (UK), 1995
BSc, Microbiology, Heriot-Watt University (UK), 1989

Projects

Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Infant HIV-1. PI, NIH.
Development of Improved Diagnostic and Surveillance Tools for Polio Virus. PI, BMGF.
Grand Challenges in Diagnostics Project, Specimen Panel Development. PI, BMGF.
Landscape Review of Current and Emerging Technologies for Use in the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis. CoPI, UNITAID.
A Fully Integrated System Assay and Platform for Detecting Clostridium difficile. coPI, NIH.
Rapid Diagnosis of MDR TB from Sputum Using a Small Fully Integrated Nucleic Acid Testing Device. Consultant, NIH.
Review date: 
3/27/2017