Health Equity

Living with fire
Blog entry | September 15, 2020
As smoke from wildfires on the West Coast makes its way across the US, it’s becoming clear that our future will involve coexistence with fire.
The sea around us
Blog entry | August 25, 2020
Oceans affect every human life — no matter how far away from a coastline a community may be. Oceans supply fresh water and oxygen, regulate the climate, influence the weather and affect human health. People rely on these large bodies of water for food, income, transportation and recreation. In turn, human activities can impact oceans and the systems they support.
Protecting health in the Great Plains
Blog entry | August 24, 2020
Editor's note: Natalie Peterson is a UW senior completing her BS in Environmental Health. Her JRCOSTEP internship was recently featured by the Indian Health Service on its website.  
Collaborating for health equity
Blog entry | August 19, 2020
The University of Washington Population Health Initiative has awarded COVID-19 population health equity research grants to three projects involving partnerships between UW Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS) and community leaders.
Facing wildfire smoke amid COVID-19
Blog entry | July 20, 2020
When Jake asked me to go on a sunset hike, I knew what was coming. We were in our favorite place: the Methow Valley of Eastern Washington. When we crested the top of the mountain, a few sunrays peeked through the clouds, lighting up the fertile valley below. Still, when he got down on one knee, I was surprised, and overcome with happiness. Life seemed full of promise.
Boosting economic recovery from the pandemic
Blog entry | July 01, 2020
 
Can trees clean up jet pollution?
Blog entry | June 25, 2020
  Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed New York’s Central Park, once called trees the lungs of the city. Trees and shrubs filter a variety of air pollutants, including nitrogen dioxide, ozone and particulate matter. But could they also benefit communities near airports by absorbing harmful ultrafine particles from aircraft exhaust?
Champion of vulnerable workers
Blog entry | June 18, 2020
Early in his career, Noah Seixas spent six months working on the assembly line of a rifle manufacturer in Massachusetts “to see what life was like on the line in a dirty, crappy factory.”
Master of disaster
Blog entry | June 17, 2020
Given the extraordinary challenges of this year’s pandemic, the students of the UW Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS) needed a superhero. Watch a student video honoring Nicole Errett
Food systems students foster resilience
Blog entry | June 02, 2020
This spring, the first group of undergraduates to complete the UW Nutritional Sciences Program’s Food Systems, Nutrition and Health major are taking the knowledge they’ve acquired and applying it to help their communities.
Latino Center honors DEOHS scholars
Blog entry | May 19, 2020
Magali Blanco and Gabino Abarca from the University of Washington School of Public Health were selected to take part in the inaugural Latino Center for Health Student Scholars Fellowship program.
Food systems under stress
Blog entry | May 06, 2020
  DEOHS Associate Professor Jennifer Otten
Diversifying the face of health care
Blog entry | May 03, 2020
Sumaya Aden BS, Environmental Health Hometown Federal Way, WA Future plans Going to medical school after graduation in 2021 “I like seeing how things happen and why and the data behind it.” - Sumaya Aden
Coronavirus guidance for farming, forestry and fishing
Blog entry | April 29, 2020
Each spring, seasonal farmworkers arrive in the Pacific Northwest for the planting season. This year, they’ve been met with a public health emergency.
Working conditions influence birth outcomes
Blog entry | April 14, 2020
Women who experience high employment precarity prior to or during pregnancy have a 48% higher risk of delivering low-birth-weight infants than women with low employment precarity, according to a study from researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health.
The water protector
Blog entry | April 14, 2020
Ola i ka Wai. Water is life. Tyler Gerken MS, Environmental Health Hometown: Kea’au, Hawai’i Island, HI Future plans: A career in the US Public Health Service, perhaps as an environmental health officer for the National Park Service or the Indian Health Service
Most people can’t work from home
Blog entry | April 08, 2020
Read the news release about Baker's study
Food in the time of coronavirus
Blog entry | March 30, 2020
Ensuring that all people have access to healthy food is a challenge in the best of times, but it has become even more daunting during the current pandemic.
Catching waterborne disease before it spreads
Blog entry | March 23, 2020
Water is essential for life, but in communities with inadequate sanitation, it can also spread diseases like polio, typhoid and hepatitis A. By monitoring wastewater and water sources contaminated by wastewater for pathogens in fecal matter, researchers and public health workers can help stop waterborne illnesses in their tracks.
From Washington to Kyrgyzstan
Blog entry | March 11, 2020
How did Esther Min, a graduate student in the UW Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS), end up at a six-hour-long dinner in Kyrgyzstan?
Fighting children's asthma at home
Blog entry | February 25, 2020
Rural children with asthma whose homes have an indoor air cleaner are 72% less likely to have an unplanned clinic or hospital visit than children in homes with no air cleaners, according to a study from the University of Washington and partners in the Yakima Valley.
Preparing for the next pandemic
Blog entry | January 17, 2020
Read more about the School of Public Health’s role with the Population Health Initiative in the new UW Public Health magazine.
Mapping jet pollution at Sea-Tac Airport
Blog entry | December 03, 2019
Communities underneath and downwind of jets landing at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport are exposed to a type of ultrafine particle pollution that is distinctly associated with aircraft, according to a new University of Washington study that is the first to identify the unique "signature" of aircraft emissions in Washington state.
Sexual harassment in the fields
Blog entry | November 22, 2019
Female farmworkers experience workplace sexual harassment at rates that are two to three times higher than in other sectors, according to recent studies.
US foreign policy could halt today’s major killers, prevent tomorrow’s outbreaks
Blog entry | November 19, 2019
According to the analysis, “strategic investments in a coordinated global-pandemics initiative would likely have a return ratio of between $17 and $20 on every $1 spent.” Curbing pandemics might also address shared global challenges, such as gender and social inequalities, and support climate adaptation and mitigation.
The lifelong health impacts of business as usual
Blog entry | November 14, 2019
Babies born today will face unprecedented health risks and life-long health consequences from rising temperatures, according to new research published Wednesday from The Lancet.
Sharing the science on vaping
Blog entry | October 14, 2019
Scientists and health professionals are rushing to assess the health effects of vaping amid a multistate outbreak of lung injuries associated with the use of e-cigarettes. Teachers could play a critical role in helping youth understand the health risks, yet little formal guidance or training for educators currently exists.
A voice for farmworkers
Blog entry | October 08, 2019
Maria Blancas, a UW PhD student and staff member in the UW Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS), will receive the 2019 Bullitt Environmental Prize for her work with immigrant farmworkers in Washington.
Tribes prepare for climate change
Blog entry | August 15, 2019
DEOHS Associate Professor Jeremy Hess Researchers from the University of Washington are teaming up with the Swinomish Tribe to evaluate strategies the Swinomish are using to adapt to climate change.
2019 DEOHS graduation
Blog entry | June 17, 2019
The UW Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS) is celebrating the 57 new graduates who received their degrees this weekend. DEOHS Chair Michael Yost presided over a Friday ceremony at Foege Auditorium honoring the students, who earned Bachelor of Science, Master of Public Health, Master of Science and PhD degrees.