Policy

Public health trailblazers
Blog entry | October 15, 2020
Explore the full list of SPH 50 Changemakers of Public Health   Five alumnae of the UW Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS) are being recognized by the UW School of Public Health as part of its 50 Changemakers of Public Health awards.
A path to public service
Blog entry | October 14, 2020
I work at the US Environmental Protection Agency as a physical scientist in the Radiation Protection program. Depending on the day, I may be developing radiological risk assessment tools, crafting risk communication products or supporting radiological emergency preparedness activities.
Living with fire
Blog entry | September 15, 2020
As smoke from wildfires on the West Coast makes its way across the US, it’s becoming clear that our future will involve coexistence with fire.
Heat, fire, smoke and health in Washington’s ag industry
Blog entry | September 03, 2020
Right now, some 140,000 agricultural workers are picking apples, peaches and other crops at the peak of Washington’s harvest season, just as Gov. Jay Inslee has declared a state of emergency in response to wildfires burning across the state.
The sea around us
Blog entry | August 25, 2020
Oceans affect every human life — no matter how far away from a coastline a community may be. Oceans supply fresh water and oxygen, regulate the climate, influence the weather and affect human health. People rely on these large bodies of water for food, income, transportation and recreation. In turn, human activities can impact oceans and the systems they support.
Reassessing chlorpyrifos and children's health
Blog entry | August 18, 2020
DEOHS Professor Lianne Sheppard
A model of scientific integrity
Blog entry | August 17, 2020
Lianne Sheppard fought recent efforts by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to suppress the role of academic scientists advising the agency on environmental policy. The University of Washington professor also battled back against attacks on her research into the link between cancer and glyphosate, a widely used herbicide.
Facing wildfire smoke amid COVID-19
Blog entry | July 20, 2020
When Jake asked me to go on a sunset hike, I knew what was coming. We were in our favorite place: the Methow Valley of Eastern Washington. When we crested the top of the mountain, a few sunrays peeked through the clouds, lighting up the fertile valley below. Still, when he got down on one knee, I was surprised, and overcome with happiness. Life seemed full of promise.
Boosting economic recovery from the pandemic
Blog entry | July 01, 2020
 
Landing her dream job
Blog entry | June 08, 2020
Kaitlyn Kelly MPH, Environmental and Occupational Health Hometown Carmel, CA Future plans Continue her work as a policy specialist for the Washington State Department of Health.
Finding beauty in the details
Blog entry | May 20, 2020
Alexa Yadama BS, Environmental Health Hometown Pullman, WA Future plans A career in environmental or public health, and eventually a master’s in public health. “ I really appreciate mixing public health with my science background and helping people with the knowledge I have.”
Working conditions influence birth outcomes
Blog entry | April 14, 2020
Women who experience high employment precarity prior to or during pregnancy have a 48% higher risk of delivering low-birth-weight infants than women with low employment precarity, according to a study from researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health.
Most people can’t work from home
Blog entry | April 08, 2020
Read the news release about Baker's study
Are travel bans effective?
Blog entry | February 07, 2020
  Countries including the US are taking dramatic steps to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus, with some barring entry to anyone who has recently visited China. But do travel bans work?
Responding now to climate change
Blog entry | January 21, 2020
Many state and local health agencies recognize the threat of climate change but need more resources and clearer, more flexible guidance to reduce its impact on public health, according to a new study from the UW Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS).
The odds of death from wildfire smoke
Blog entry | January 09, 2020
Washington is expected to face increasingly smoky summers. A few things you can do to prepare now:
Saving lives and the planet
Blog entry | January 06, 2020
 
Connecting the dots between science and impact
Blog entry | December 16, 2019
Rachel Shaffer doesn't flinch from controversy. As a doctoral student in the UW Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, Shaffer is wading into some of the most heated environmental health issues of our time. Her PhD work in environmental toxicology investigates the connections between air pollution and dementia. That's just the beginning.
DEOHS professor named editor of leading environmental health journal
Blog entry | December 15, 2019
As a physician with a passion for science, social justice and patient care, Dr. Joel Kaufman gravitated to public health from his earliest days as a college student pursuing BA and MD degrees in a combined six-year program.
Mapping jet pollution at Sea-Tac Airport
Blog entry | December 03, 2019
Communities underneath and downwind of jets landing at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport are exposed to a type of ultrafine particle pollution that is distinctly associated with aircraft, according to a new University of Washington study that is the first to identify the unique "signature" of aircraft emissions in Washington state.
Sexual harassment in the fields
Blog entry | November 22, 2019
Female farmworkers experience workplace sexual harassment at rates that are two to three times higher than in other sectors, according to recent studies.
Champion of ergonomics
Blog entry | November 21, 2019
After 18 years at the University of Washington, Peter Johnson, professor in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, will retire in mid-November.
The lifelong health impacts of business as usual
Blog entry | November 14, 2019
Babies born today will face unprecedented health risks and life-long health consequences from rising temperatures, according to new research published Wednesday from The Lancet.
On the ground in disaster's wake
Blog entry | September 26, 2019
  From flood-damaged Houston to fire-ravaged Paradise, CA, Nicole Errett’s research takes her into the heart of communities trying to recover after catastrophe strikes.
Protecting precarious workers
Blog entry | May 16, 2019
DEOHS at the Washington State Legislature UW DEOHS faculty and research will help inform state policy as part of several bills passed by the Washington State Legislature this spring:
Opioids and injured workers
Blog entry | April 17, 2019
Washington is considered a national leader in efforts to reduce prescription drug overdose, thanks in part to changes in opioid prescribing practices championed by Dr. Gary Franklin.
Changing the rules on toxic emissions
Blog entry | January 17, 2019
The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to change how it tallies up the costs and benefits of rules limiting mercury emissions—a move two University of Washington experts say would make it harder to protect people from the harmful health effects of air pollution.   
A matter of scientific integrity
Blog entry | December 19, 2018
A group of 15 air pollution experts—including three scientists from the UW Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (DEOHS)—say recent changes made by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have damaged the quality and credibility of the EPA’s scientific review process for federal clean air standards.
US health threatened by climate change
Blog entry | November 29, 2018
US health care systems should extend their commitment to “do no harm” by ensuring that their own operations are powered by renewable energy, according to a new brief on climate change and health in the United States.
Dirty skies and your health
Blog entry | August 09, 2018
We’re learning more all the time about the health risks of breathing dirty air—and the news is alarming. Michael Yost, DEOHS professor and chair.